Truman

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

In 1904 a Moroccan Berber brigand named Mulai Ahmed er Raisuli—along with a gang of bully boys—kidnapped an American businessman named Ion Hanford Perdicaris. Raisuli demanded $70,000 ransom—$1,842,105.26 in 2014 dollars. Theodore Roosevelt was president at the time, and, in the eyes of the world, he was carrying a "big stick."

This past Sunday on CNN, eight Democratic contenders debated the issues and each other. Tonight, the 10 declared Republicans are going to take on each other in the same venue before a national TV audience. In the words of the CNN press release: Due to the historical nature of presidential debates and the significance of these forums to the American public, CNN believes strongly that the debates should be accessible to the public. The candidates need to be held accountable for what they say throughout the election process. I watched the Sunday evening Democratic debate, growing more and more depressed for two reasons:

Dadaism was a wacko cultural movement dreamed up by artists, writers and musicians. First announced in neutral Zurich on Bastille Day, July 14, 1916, in the middle of World War I, it was the “reaction to what many of these artists saw as nothing more than an insane spectacle of collective homicide.” Dadaism quickly spread across Europe and came to New York, its main proponents being avant-garde photographer Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp, whose iconic “Nude Descending Staircase” is featured in every art history course that deals with the modern era. The basic tenet of the Dada art, music and literature was screaming, wrenching, fingernails-on-the-blackboard

Think Before You Act Feb. 2, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 9 IN THE NEWS Multimedia Launch of 'Bubble' Gets Mixed Response An experiment in launching a movie almost simultaneously in the cinema, on cable television and on DVD attracted few theater-goers, although the film has done well in DVD orders, according to its makers. —Sarah McBride, The Wall Street Journal, Jan. 30, 2006 In the film world, the time-honored sequence for release of a new movie is theater distribution first, followed by DVDs for purchase and rental, and finally presentation on cable or network TV. "Bubble" is a low-budget thriller directed by

by Bob Hacker This analysis of Easton Press is based on reviewing only four control packages and without the benefit of seeing any list segmentation or program performance figures. Targeting is inferred from product definition, copy platforms and appeals. The Basic Business The first thing we see is that the business is based on a few fundamentals that don't change: • The content always appears to be of high intrinsic value because of the author and/or the subject matter. • All titles are presented as "limited" or "special" and use exclusivity and "fear of loss" to build value. • The titles are

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