Tim Phillips

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

ROTFL I almost fell off the chair when I saw Lawrence Van Gelder’s little squib (reprinted in full nearby) in The New York Times, reporting that the Chinese have edited “Pirates of the Caribbean” because one of the characters “vilifies and humiliates the Chinese.” Imagine! The premier pirates of American films and other intellectual property not only have pirated yet another blockbuster, but also have edited out a Chinese character because it was “in line with Hollywood’s old tradition of demonizing the Chinese.” Is it time to rethink doing business with China? I am not talking human rights and animal abuses such as:

Readers Respond to “Book Pirates!” published July 18, 2006, which discussed Kessinger Publishing’s copyright theft. A fine depiction of your copyright problem. Since the damages occurred where you live, how about filing for the max in small claims court—separately—against all parties involved. That way they have to show up in your local court, without lawyers and at the mercy of your neighborhood judge. Subpoena their records relevant to the infringements. If they don’t supply them, they lose. Very unlikely they’ll want to show up and, if not, they lose. You can usually collect via local sheriffs or similar. My guess is that you’ll get some

A time when the Chinese did not have a monopoly on theft May 2, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 34 IN THE NEWS Next Step for Counterfeiters: Faking the Whole Company In mid-2004, managers at the Tokyo headquarters of the Japanese electronics giant NEC started receiving reports that pirated keyboards and blank CD and DVD discs bearing the company's brand were on sale in retail outlets in Beijing and Hong Kong. So like many other manufacturers combating intellectual property thieves in China, the company hired an investigator to track down the pirates. After two years and thousands of hours of investigation in conjunction

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