Teddy Roosevelt

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

As readers of last Thursday’s edition may remember, my wife Peggy and I are back from Normandy and a three-day immersion in World War II and D-Day—a journey I have wanted to take for five decades. I wish I had a week. Coming home to the story of General Petraeus appointing the new crop of Army generals was unsettling. In World War II, America’s top generals in Europe were world-class—George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton Jr. and Omar N. Bradley to name four. Every now and again, fantastic images cross my brain. For example, if we could bring J.S. Bach back

This past Sunday on CNN, eight Democratic contenders debated the issues and each other. Tonight, the 10 declared Republicans are going to take on each other in the same venue before a national TV audience. In the words of the CNN press release: Due to the historical nature of presidential debates and the significance of these forums to the American public, CNN believes strongly that the debates should be accessible to the public. The candidates need to be held accountable for what they say throughout the election process. I watched the Sunday evening Democratic debate, growing more and more depressed for two reasons:

Plus … Best Wishes for a Joyous Holiday Dec. 20, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 57 IN THE NEWS Letters | Academy of Natural Sciences not serving well It's indeed a shame the museum is going under, but The Inquirer's article ["Dinosaur Museum Itself Is Threatened"] stresses its importance only to the scientific community. The museum hasn't been stressing its importance to the general public for many, many years; that neglect shows, and that's why the public has turned away from it. --Allene Murphey, Letter to the Editors, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Dec. 16, 2005 In the 1980s, the Whitney Museum of American

By Donna Baier Stein Ever hear of a man named Henry George? Einstein, Tolstoy and Churchill were big supporters of his. He wrote a book called "Progress and Poverty." He ran for mayor of New York City in 1886 and outpolled Teddy Roosevelt. George probably is best known for his single tax theory and, if I understand it correctly, the thought that people and companies should earn money based on the value of what they contribute, rather than on our current supply-and-demand system. It's tricky to assign value, of course. Should Britney Spears earn so much more than a really good grade

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