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Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

This past summer came a stunning announcement: "Floating an Idea: Would P&G Sell Ivory Soap?" The Wall Street Journal further writes, "As Company Pares Brands, an Icon's Status is Weighed Against Sinking Sales." I grew up with Ivory soap. Throughout my life, I would try different brands—often with negative reactions. Whereupon, I went back to Ivory. Ditching Ivory would be like General Motors trashing Chevy!

The day President Kennedy was shot, The New York Times had one relatively unknown reporter in Dallas, Tom Wicker, age 37. His 3,696-word front-page account is a masterpiece. For the news media today, it's easy to cobble together a story. Journalists have cellphones, helicopter and drone photos, Google, Internet posts, cable TV coverage and instant communications with the newsroom half a world away.

“Database marketing is officially sexy,” gushed researcher Julie Katz on April 11, 2007 in Forrester’s Marketing Blog in response to the announcement that Procter & Gamble’s Elva Lewis has conned her management into testing the database marketing waters. “The boat’s setting sail, and we have one foot on the dock and one on the boat,” Lewis told AdAge.com’s Matthew Creamer. “If you listen to A.G. Lafley or Jim Stengel, they’re all talking about the declining return on investment in TV. This trend tells us that we should go to one-to-one marketing. We just haven’t put our money where our mouth is.” If you listen

With March Madness beginning, it rapidly becomes clear that one win is nice, but it doesn’t ensure that your team will last through the first weekend. The “One and Done” scenario is similar in the direct mail arena, where one-year subscriptions and one-product-only purchases are certainly useful but don’t build success in the long run. Rather, you want to increase overall sales and orders; a.k.a., get more wins. To do that—and thus get more return per package—consider the following five ways to upgrade your current offer. To help craft this winning formula, Target Marketing leaned on two reputable “coaches” in the field: Alan

Who Speaks for Your Company? The new General Motors strategy of offering employee pricing on all new models resulted in a 47-percent sales increase in June. Ford promptly followed suit. Chrysler went them both one better by not only offering employee discounts but bringing back Lee Iacocca--the man who saved the company in 1982 and became its spokesman--to do the TV commercials, complete with the line he made famous, "If you can find a better car, buy it." In 1955 Ogilvy & Mather dreamed up the idea of using the CEO of Schweppes USA, the elegant, bearded Commander Edward Whitehead, as the centerpiece of

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