Mitt Romney

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Earlier this year, senior members of President Barack Obama’s campaign team took a trip to Las Vegas. Nevada holds a special place in Obama-wonk lore as the place where his months-long strategy of defeating Hillary Clinton by slowly and surely amassing delegates emerged. But the operatives were not there in March for any political reason. They were there to make money—specifically to land what they hoped would be the first corporate client for their new advertising business, Analytics Media Group (A.M.G.). Its bland name obscures its relatively grand promise: to deliver to commercial advertisers some of the Obama campaign's secret,

The last few years, we’ve seen a divide in politics—bigger than we’ve seen in generations. In the U.S. … The most loyal of the Democrats and Republicans are each digging in deeper. Around the world, we are seeing the same divide … If your entire brand is about healthcare, I get that you should have a position on anything to do with healthcare. … But if you are selling organic groceries, fried chicken, washing machines or laptops, you’d be really stupid as a brand to pick a side and speak out. I love politics, but I love making money even

What does this actually mean for AdLand? The tax deduction for advertising costs could be revisited. While Mr. Obama didn't bring it up during his first term, it's just the sort of tax loophole that was mentioned by both candidates during the debates. Dan Jaffe, executive vice president of government relations for the Association of National Advertisers, told Ad Age earlier this year that it would be unwise "for advertising companies to think we are immune. We will not take anything for granted." Online privacy is another area of concern.

Offices closed, subways shut down, streets fell quiet and marketers sprung into action, with some referencing Hurricane Sandy in messaging and others taking action around the storm, which could contend for the worst on record along the East Coast. As Sandy worked her way up the Eastern Seaboard toward New York City on Monday, many agencies and marketers across the Northeast kept staffers at home. Two of the ad shops in New York City most closely situated to mandatory evacuation zones

You can learn a lot from the Obama and Romney campaigns about how to use Twitter, says Shane Steele, Twitter's director of sales and marketing. Both campaigns are innovative; they tweet about events in real time, for instance, and show behind-the-scenes photos to followers. "Because the political campaigns have to deal with a rapid response environment, there are some great lessons for brands to think about as they plan their own campaigns," said Steele. "There are more tweets every two days now than total tweets leading up to the 2008 election."

During Tuesday's debate, GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney said that he had been given "binders full of women" when he sought females for cabinet positions while governor of Mass. Sarcastic binder enthusiasts pounced. A meme was born. Snarky Amazon.com customers have posted slews of fake (though incredibly in-depth) reviews on, you guessed it, binders. Many of the reviews, tongues firmly in cheek, give credit to the binders for their ability to contain females. ... This is hardly the first time Amazon.com customers have gone wild with the fake reviews.

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