Mark Simmons

Being a macho mass-produced product was a positive attribute when it reassured consumers they would get quality and consistency. Now quality is no longer a differentiator (you don’t have it, you’re the weakest link, good-by). Being big is now seen as a negative. It connotes arrogance and selfishness. All marketers need to act small. That means you, up there. —excerpted from “Punk Marketing,” (Collins, March 2007, $25.95) by Richard Laermer and Mark Simmons; for more www.harpercollins.com

Marketers can use their own good upbringing (e.g., honesty in front of the cookie jar) as a way to stand out from thine enemy, by noting that the other guys have bad habits that get in the way of their being open to their customers (who should be yours). —excerpted from “Punk Marketing,” (Collins, March 2007, $25.95) by Richard Laermer and Mark Simmons; for more www.harpercollins.com

Content aside, “Punk Marketing: Get Off Your Ass and Join the Revolution” ($29.95, HarperCollins), is a revolution in reading fundamentals. Cross out paragraphs, rip out pages—the book’s prologue invites you to. But whatever you do, know the authors care little about the means by which you enjoy it (or not), so long as the end is anti-pretty-much-everything you’ve known/done/learned in marketing up until now. With informative prose interspersed with engagingly random factoids, authors Richard Laermer and Mark Simmons attempt to snap a finger in front of what they contend to be the collectively glazed-over eyes of the marketing world. The flag they’re waving: “Power has

Consumers are tired of not being told the truth in marketing, and since they can see it clearly themselves, all marketing that does not pass muster is summarily ignored. (Yes, we like Dijon, too.) To win back consumer trust, marketers need to be clear and honest about their products—no exceptions, thank you. All disclaimers must be avoided. Rid ye of what is called mouseprint, before it gets rid of ye. —excerpted from “Punk Marketing,” by Richard Laermer and Mark Simmons (Collins, March 2007, $25.95); for more www.harpercollins.com

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