Julie Doll

By Christen Gruebel, associate editor, Inside Direct Mail Christmas seems to creep up a little earlier every year. Normally, one can stave off the telltale jingle of sleigh bells at least until the remaining Thanksgiving leftovers have been digested, yet Oxmoor House has other ideas. Every year, the book-publishing division of Birmingham, Ala.-based company Southern Progress sends out tests for its “Christmas with Southern Living” book promotion package at a time when snow cones, rather than snowmen, are more likely to be on the mind. But according to Oxmoor Senior Promotions Manager Julie Doll, it’s this disconnect that could explain why an effort promoting a

(A case study from the June 2006 issue of Inside Direct Mail) It’s not too big, not too small; in fact, it’s just right. This digest-sized magalog, or bookalog, titled “The Little Book of Favorite Homestyle Recipes,” has proven to be the perfect fit for selling Southern Living’s cookbook series (Archive code #101-171600-0603). Yet the handy format, which was mailed in plenty about five years ago, dropped off of the Who’s Mailing What! Archive’s radar after 2002. It wasn’t until a few months ago that a bookalog from the publisher turned up in the Archive again. So, did Southern Living find a better package in

By Sharon R. Cole It's not too big, not too small; in fact, it's just right. This digest-sized magalog, or bookalog, titled "The Little Book of Favorite Homestyle Recipes," has proven to be the perfect fit for selling Southern Living's cookbook series (Archive code #101-171600-0603). Yet the handy format, which was mailed in plenty about five years ago, dropped off of the Who's Mailing What! Archive's radar after 2002. It wasn't until a few months ago that a bookalog from the publisher turned up in the Archive again. So, did Southern Living find a better package in the meantime? Julie Doll, senior promotion manager

By Tracy A. Gill Direct mail guru Axel Andersson has asserted, "If you want to increase your response, then dramatically improve your offer." Oxmoor House, the book publishing arm of Des Moines, Iowa-based Southern Progress, put this maxim to the test back in 2002 when its direct mail campaign for the Southern Living annual cookbook needed a lift. And wouldn't you know it--the theory proved its worth. At the time, Oxmoor was promoting the annual cookbook with a bookalog control and a small appetizer cookbook premium. As Julie Doll, senior promotions manager, explains, Oxmoor had just run a successful test of

By Irene Cherkassky Giving prospects a sneak peek at its product is a strategy that's worked well for Gooseberry Patch, a division of Leisure Arts, and its partner company, Oxmoor House, the publisher and direct marketer of Gooseberry Patch craft books. Oxmoor has used a 5" x 7-1/2" bookalog mailing to promote the annual Gooseberry Patch Christmas book since 2001. This control, in effect, is a pocket-sized sampling of the decorating tips, products and recipes customers can expect to find in the pages of the Christmas book. The 36-page booklet intersperses bright, colorful images of baked goods and crafts projects with

More Blogs