Dick Hodgson

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Why would BMW send me a $3 mailing with a barf bag as the centerpiece?
Peggy and I drive a 10-year-old used Jag. It works fine.
We have no intention of buying another car—ever.
So why would BMW send me this weird, grotesquely expensive mailing?

The first book that we published — "The Secrets of Emotional, Hot-Button COPYWRITING" — was based on some of the most successful examples of direct mail that were found in Who's Mailing What! It continues to be a big seller for us, in part because there aren't any other books about copy drivers and even fewer that showcase the mail pieces that have earned companies millions of dollars. 

For more than 35 years, my wife, Peggy, and I have been saving our direct mail for inclusion in the giant Who’s Mailing What! Archive of samples in more than 200 categories—consumer, business and nonprofit.

On the Mount Olympus of direct marketing, two figures stand at the summit looking down at everyone else that followed: * Regnault de Mouçon, Bishop of Chartres, France. * Martin Conroy of Madison, Connecticut and Captiva, Florida. On the night of June 10, 1197, fire raged through Chartres, destroying many of the buildings and severely damaging the cathedral. At first, it was believed that the city’s precious relic—the Sancta Camisia, the robe that Mary wore when giving birth to Jesus—was lost in the flames. Bishop Regnault de Mouçon wanted to rebuild, but without their relic, the citizens of Chartres gave in to despair. Two

I’ve been reading obituaries since the age of 12, fascinated to see how entire lives have been summed up in a few paragraphs. Last week a The New York Times headline about the passing of George Wetherill, 80, described him as an “Expert on Dating of Rocks.” Did dating of rocks mean determining their age? Or did he study people who liked to take rocks out to dinner and a movie? Either way, I wasn’t interested enough in his life and career to read on. Nor am I real interested in people who spend their lives in the credit card business—the delivery of financial nicotine to

Spend Time on It, and You Can Change Your Life Jan. 19, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 5 IN THE NEWS More Jobs Being Found Online, but That Doesn't Mean It's Easy One of the first things Brooke Christiansen did as college graduation neared last spring was post her résumé on three of the largest Internet job boards: Monster, CareerBuilder and HotJobs. For the most part, she said, it was an exercise in frustration. —Barbara Whitaker, The New York Times, Jan. 15, 2006 Cover Letters Get You In the Door, So Be Sure Not to Dash Them Off A great cover letter is

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