David Schwartz

Edited by Lisa Yorgey Lester Chicca D'Agostino, president, Focus USA Given recent developments, it appears unlikely that we will be able to prevent future legislation. The best we can do is try to mitigate it. Apart from data security, another major issue is how we treat consumers via our advertising messages. All of us—brokers, managers and list owners—need to screen advertising offers. Don't rent or broker names unless you have seen the offer. If you feel it invades a consumer's privacy, reveals specific details about a family, is deceptive, or is not in compliance with GLB, FACTA and other laws—try to have the

Chicca D'Agostino, president, Focus USA Given recent developments, it appears unlikely that we will be able to prevent future legislation. The best we can do is try to mitigate it. Apart from data security, another major issue is how we treat consumers via our advertising messages. All of us—brokers, managers and list owners—need to screen advertising offers. Don't rent or broker names unless you have seen the offer. If you feel it invades a consumer's privacy, reveals specific details about a family, is deceptive, or is not in compliance with GLB, FACTA and other laws—try to have the copy corrected … or reject

When it comes to prospecting with compiled lists, it's imperative that the data used to create them are accurate. "All data on a file is subject to scrutiny to ensure the overall integrity of the information," write ALC of New York LLC's Andy Ostroy and Margaret Iadeluca in their article "Sleuthing Compiled Lists." This comment could just as easily pertain to the scandal surrounding data broker ChoicePoint's sale of sensitive personal information to criminals who posed as legitimate business owners. One of the sticking points for privacy advocates and some congressmen investigating the need for tighter data protection is that not only do

Experts encourage marketers to broaden their list horizons. The constant in the direct marketing world is the need to hunt for viable sources of prospecting names. In the early days of this industry, the variety of lists now on the market didn’t exist; list professionals and their clients would have to talk companies—sometimes competitors—into renting or exchanging names. As the number of lists on the market grew, it became a great deal easier for marketers to find quality lists for their offers. Now, average response rates suggest that marketers have tapped out every possible list source. According to a number of

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