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By Christen Gruebel Love can get you far in this world, but to reference an old lyrical pearl from Motown legend Barrett Strong: It don't pay your bills. Your product or publication may have generated a loyal enough following to secure an enthusiastic prospect's order, but until you secure her dollars, your ROI won't be breaking records anytime soon. Accomplishing the troublesome task of getting customers to open their checkbooks is no easy feat, which is why, in the hierarchy of direct mail, a billing series exists in a class all of its own. Unlike traditional efforts that impel action through relationship-building tactics, bills

Love can get you far in this world, but to reference an old lyrical pearl from Motown legend Barrett Strong: It don’t pay your bills. Your product or publication may have generated a loyal enough following to secure an enthusiastic prospect’s order, but until you secure her dollars, your ROI won’t be breaking records anytime soon. Accomplishing the troublesome task of getting customers to open their checkbooks is no easy feat, which is why, in the hierarchy of direct mail, a billing series exists in a class all of its own. Unlike traditional efforts that impel action through relationship-building tactics, bills arrive with one, laser-focused

By Paul Barbagallo As most direct mail gurus will affirm, the first variable to test when response flags is the outer envelope (perhaps after the offer, depending on who you talk to). Recently, the Who's Mailing What! Archive has logged some interesting subscription-renewal appeals that employ the use of multiple poly windows on the carrier—a newer, bolder strategy for some circulation professionals. Two in particular come to us from Conde Nast's GQ and The Atlantic. Both efforts adopt a refreshing approach to the subscription-renewal package by letting a little light in. Publishers normally take a formulaic approach for renewals that consists of

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