Caroline Zimmermann

She began life after college as a school teacher before getting a job in the circulation department of a small magazine in New York City. That was when Caroline Zimmermann began to learn about direct marketing, including how much she liked it, to the point that she next got a job at a boutique direct marketing agency, where she became fascinated by both the art and the science of direct marketing—including whether or not her promotions worked.

She began life after college as a school teacher before getting a job in the circulation department of a small magazine in New York City. That was when Caroline Zimmermann began to learn about direct marketing, including how much she liked it, to the point that she next got a job at a boutique direct marketing agency, where she became fascinated by both the art and the science of direct marketing—including whether or not her promotions worked.

For the last two decades—and particularly the last few years­—vouchers have been a mailstream staple. And despite occasional evidence to the contrary, the format doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. “It’s really amazing,” states Patricia Silver, president of Bethesda, Md., consultancy Silver Marketing. “That little package, for the right product, does so well.” Most of the time, that “right product” is either a magazine or a newspaper, but voucher fever has been spreading of late, working its way into the programs of association, software, nonprofit and even financial services mailers. This can be attributed, in part, to savvy mailers “stealing smart,” contends Caroline Zimmermann,

By Christen Gruebel Oh, the plight of poor, misunderstood postage. You certainly can't send mail without it. In truth, an outer envelope looks rather bare with an empty upper-right-hand corner; yet, mailers seem to harbor mixed feelings over just how neutral this territory actually is. One camp regards postage as nothing more than an expenditure, perhaps part of a tertiary round of testing (at best) reserved for only the largest mailers with equally large budgets. Others raise postage out of the confines of inconsequence and deem it an integral part of creative development. Caroline Zimmermann, president and CEO of The Zimmermann Agency,

Oh, the plight of poor, misunderstood postage. You certainly can’t send mail without it. In truth, an outer envelope looks rather bare with an empty upper-right-hand corner; yet, mailers seem to harbor mixed feelings over just how neutral this territory actually is. One camp regards postage as nothing more than an expenditure, perhaps part of a tertiary round of testing (at best) reserved for only the largest mailers with equally large budgets. Others raise postage out of the confines of inconsequence and deem it an integral part of creative development. Caroline Zimmermann, president and CEO of The Zimmermann Agency, even goes so far

By Marissa Fabris At first glance, you might not have guessed that the understated outer envelope of Kiplinger's Personal Finance's long-term control is, in fact, the key to the effort's success. The white, in-line produced, #10 envelope, characterized by a varnished, green, faux label, appears simple, but a few subtle elements on the envelope have resulted in a package that consistently speaks well to its target audience and effectively draws them inside to the offer (Archive Code #205-174257-0508). According to Caroline Zimmermann, president of The Zimmermann Agency, the Brookville, N.Y.-based agency responsible for the package's design, "What I consider [integral] to this

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