North Carolina

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

When I attended grade school back in the Paleozoic Era, my classmates and I loved our weekly spelling contests where, no matter who our facilitator was, we looked not only to master our assigned words but also to tackle some wild card selections. Millions of years later, I still geek out on these letter placement challenges and am thankful that Google Trends recently released a map of the most misspelled word in each state, with some of the troublemakers striking me as “beautiful” reminders of how even common utterances can catch us by “surprise.”

Yesterday during his press conference, President-elect Donald Trump vowed to bring jobs to the states whose voters helped him win. He talked about car manufacturing jobs that will remain in the U.S. once he takes office in a few days and the companies that won’t be offshoring work because of his intervention.

How many National Do Not Call List violations does it take to get yourself a class-action lawsuit? The magic number would appear to be 57,606,609—or at least it is in the case of "United States of America, and the States of California, Illinois, North Carolina, and Ohio v. Dish Network, L.L.C.," currently working its way towards a verdict.

Congratulations! Mazeltov! Happy Wedding! There are all kinds of ways for travel, hospitality and more marketers to be welcome at nuptial celebrations, and same-sex marriages seem no different. That's even truer now that the U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear cases from Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin and Indiana. On Monday, the court declined to hear arguments from those states that were opposed to the marriages, in effect bringing the total of states allowing same-sex nuptials to 24.

Iowa and North Carolina said they are looking into a breach involving a subsidiary of Experian that exposed some 200 million social security numbers, in addition to two states that previously announced investigations. Separately U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill, a Democrat from Missouri, chided the company, saying she was concerned it had changed its explanation of how it was responding to the breach. McCaskill told Reuters she was troubled to learn Experian has recently said it would not be able to notify people whose social security numbers were compromised in the scheme. "It's troubling that Experian would wait three months after

Hurricane Irene menaced the Eastern seaboard, pounding tens of millions of Americans with wind, rain and floods—but largely sparing New York after an unprecedented shutdown of the largest U.S. city ahead of the massive storm. In New Jersey, the ocean surge and rainfall caused severe inland flooding. Gov. Chris Christie said damages there would total at least $1 billion and could reach "tens of billions of dollars." Virginia's governor called the blackout in his state its second-largest ever and warned that electricity might not be restored for a week.

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