Finland

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

Fans of Honor Society couldn't have gotten a better deal. Concertgoers who checked in on a mobile application got the ultimate offer from the Los Angeles-based band of New Yorkers—the musicians themselves.

Not even the most intimate love letters, payslips, overdue bills and other personal messages will be spared under the controversial scheme. The service, aimed at cutting the number of postmen and reducing CO2 emissions in the sparsely-populated country, is being offered on a voluntary basis initially. Volunteers will receive an email or a mobile phone text message as soon as their paper mail has been opened, scanned and sent as an electronic image to a secure digital mailbox, to which only the intended recipient has access.

Did you see this story about Finland's postal service? They're conducting an experiment with a small group of customers, in order to cut down on pollution and overall costs, in which all household mail is opened by postal employees in a "secured" location and then scanned and sent by email to the customer. I suppose, in the age of Facebook, that people don't mind having other people eyeing their personal mail.

Adieu, Franc! Bonjour, Euro! By Lisa Yorgey Fireworks, parades and great fanfare marked France's adieu to the franc, a currency in circulation in its current form for more than 200 years. The Germans were a bit more pragmatic in their lebe woh—or goodbye—to the deutsche mark and let it quietly retire, reports Sascha Fuhren, marketing director, Deutsche Post. In total, about 304 million people living within 12 European countries have bid a fond farewell to their national currencies and embraced the euro. The Changeover The three-year transitional phase for the euro currency came to an end on Jan. 1, 2002. Euro cash

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