World Vision

Direct Response Innovator Russ Reid Dies
December 11, 2013

Russ Reid, a direct marketing guru and founder of the agency that bears his name, died on Saturday in his Sierra Madre, Calif., home. According to Russ Reid Chairman Tom Harrison, he had been suffering from Parkinson’s Disease, but the cause of death was pneumonia. Reid was 82. “He was a giant in this industry,” said Harrison. “He basically invented a lot of aspects of direct response.” Reid founded his Pasadena, Calif.-based company in 1964. He retired in 2001, but remained interested in and involved with the agency

Direct Mail Is a Dinosaur
September 1, 2011

Not every company should be sending direct mail today. Like the other channels, its effectiveness depends on whether or not your direct mail triggers your target market profitably.

Small 
Loans, 
Big Picture
August 1, 2011

Federal Way, Wash.-based World Vision Micro puts funding into the hands of those who need it the most while integrating its Web and print marketing efforts.

Picking Up the Pace
August 1, 2011

Smart adaptation is key for today's marketer, and perhaps no story illustrates that better than our cover story, "Small Loans, Big Picture."

Blockbuster Direct Mail 2004 Axel Andersson Grand Controls
April 1, 2005

The following is the full list of Grand Controls identified by the Who's Mailing What! Archive as having been mailed for three years or more during the past decade (1995-2004). For more information on any of these mailings, contact Archive Director Paul Bobnak, at (215) 238-5225. Or, to order access to the entire direct mail library of mailings received by the Archive between 1994 and the present, visit www.whosmailingwhat.com. AARP Membership Registration Archive Code: 571AMASRP0604Z AARP Membership Card Archive Code: 571AMASRP0397A AARP Certificate of Admission Archive Code: 573AMASRP1095AZ Advertising Age Year/$69.95 Archive Code: 205ADAGEM0799Z Air & Space 5 + 1

Judging the Echo Awards (1,302 words)
October 1, 2000

by Lois K. Geller Just imagine. You open up your mailbox and find a silver sack envelope—the kind that newspapers sometimes come in. You open it up and there's a newspaper—at least it feels like a newspaper—but wait, it's entirely blank except for the name on the masthead. An attached response card reads, "You fill this in and we'll fill you in." It's a really unique approach to selling a newspaper subscription, because you're holding it in your hand and you really want to read it. Having spent two days judging The 2000 Direct Marketing Association's International ECHO Award final submissions, I am

Is It Time to Test a Freemium? (815 words)
April 1, 1998

by Dick Goldsmith They shouldn't do this to me! My mother did it to me when I was little. I'm grown-up now. It shouldn't still be happening. And yet, they still make me feel guilty. Who? The direct marketers, that's who. I didn't ask for all those cards and labels, but I keep using them. So I have to keep sending them money. A freemium is a little something extra in a direct mail package. Its purpose, of course, is to lift response. It does this by involving the reader or giving the reader guilt. It gets its name from the fact that