Time Inc.

CRM Special Report: Taking CRM Outside
February 1, 2004

Elements of a Successful Outsourced Solution Outsourcing CRM solutions is a growing phenomenon that is generating a good deal of interest. For the purposes of this article, outsourced CRM solutions are defined as marketing automation applications that may include: hosted marketing databases, campaign management, lead generation/management, reporting and/or data mining. These applications may be hosted singly or in a turnkey solution. The benefits of outsourcing a CRM solution can be substantial, both in terms of revenue enhancement and cost reduction. Typically, marketers see benefits accrue slowly in the first few months after implementation, as the new technology and processes are thoroughly learned and integrated

When Marketing Was Fun ?
November 1, 2003

By Denny Hatch I hate to count the number of times I have nearly veered off the road trying to figure out what a wordy billboard is all about. Billboards today are serious and confusing. Does anyone remember the old red-and-white Burma-Shave signs by the side of the road—one after the other—that touted the brushless shaving cream? There were several hundred versions of these—every one of them a hoot. Each sign had a little bit of copy; just enough so that you didn't take your eyes off the road for too long. This was followed by another and another, until you had the whole

Are You In or Out?
November 1, 2003

By Gina Valentino Nobody likes to talk about outsourcing. Looking beyond the walls of the organization is complicated. But for good managers, the decision-making process should be ruled by simple math and balanced with sound judgment. Regardless of the type of company, outsourcing provides alternatives to hiring full-time employees and investing in capital. As with any decision, a cost justification is necessary. Each organization is different, and the decision to outsource or develop the resources internally requires due diligence. Keep It Simple There are as many metrics as there are managers. When developing comparison data to determine whether in-house or outsource options

Software Knowing When to Upgrade
April 1, 2003

By Alicia Orr Suman How do you know when it's time to upgrade your fulfillment software? Of course, looking at the number of orders processed by your distribution center is the first consideration. But it's a more complicated issue than that. Expansion into new markets or new business channels such as the Web also may necessitate a more sophisticated software system. Then there are other factors specific to your business to consider. To determine whether you should pursue a software upgrade, first take a look at your operation's current business processes. As a mailer that recently went through a software upgrade, Daryle Scott, president

Nuts 'n Bolts -5-Minute Interview with John Squires, Time Inc.
March 1, 2003

By Paul Barbagallo Target Marketing spent a few moments on the phone with this year's inductee into The Direct Marketing Association (The DMA) Circulation Hall of Fame, John Squires, executive vice president, Time Inc. Squires' responsibilities include overseeing Time Inc. consumer marketing, Time Inc. Interactive, and Entertainment Weekly magazine. Target Marketing: In this tough economic climate, what is one thing circulation directors can do to maintain their circulation? Squires: I think probably the area with the most opportunity right now is to look at the marketing flexibility that's been provided by the revision of the ABC rules that were put into effect a

Don't Hit 'Send' ... Yet
March 1, 2003

The Internet's Lightning Speed Is No Excuse For Shoddy Communication By Alicia Orr Suman I just figured out how to adjust the "send" option on my laptop's e-mail. It had been set to send all messages immediately—big mistake. Several times I've hit send only to regret it a few seconds later. A half-written message inadvertently goes out, or worse, a message written hastily is sent without my really having first thought of the consequences of sending it. The absolute wonder of the Internet is that it allows us to communicate at light speed: Just click and go. But it carries with it an

Just About Anything Can be Sold Via Direct Mail (949 words)
February 1, 2003

By Lois K. Geller Looking at mail on a snowy eve. Christmas in New York means mail. I get bills, catalogs, happy holidays cards, fascinating letters about "what the (NAME HERE) family did last year," solo mailers, self-mailers, letters from good friends, and a special kind of mail from "other friends" that starts to come in mid-December. These other friends are the wonderful people who look after my neighbors and me all year long. My favorite is the annual "Seasons Greetings" from the 21 employees of my apartment building. The folded single sheet someone slides under my door has blurry color photos of

It's Time to Track Your E-mail Campaign Results
January 1, 2003

By Regina Brady At the end of 2001 my crystal ball told me the economy would start to pick up during the first half of 2002, and that by the end of the year, marketers would enjoy resurgence in business. These days, I use that crystal ball as a paperweight. Now it's another new year. Times are tough. You've had to figure out how to do more with fewer resources. It's a challenge, but with creativity and focus you can find some bright lights on the current, murky landscape. Many marketers have spent the last couple of years building better Web sites with

Make Your New Year's E-mail Resolutions
January 1, 2003

Resolution #1: It's Time to Track Your Results By Regina Brady At the end of 2001 my crystal ball told me the economy would start to pick up during the first half of 2002, and that by the end of the year, marketers would enjoy resurgence in business. These days, I use that crystal ball as a paperweight. Now it's another new year. Times are tough. You've had to figure out how to do more with fewer resources. It's a challenge, but with creativity and focus you can find some bright lights on the current, murky landscape. Many marketers have spent the last

A World of Opportunity
November 1, 2002

U.S. Marketers still have room to grow in global markets; they just need to rethink their strategy. By Lisa Yorgey Lester Press headlines have led many U.S. direct marketers to believe international direct marketing is all doom and gloom. But quite the opposite is true. Despite the reluctance of many companies to take the risk associated with global expansion, direct marketers have continued to achieve higher response rates abroad. What's more, new trade agreements will open untapped and underserved markets for U.S. exports. As direct marketing began to grow worldwide in the 1990s, it became a new avenue of expansion for U.S. mailers. As