Hillel

HarperCollins’ Quixotic Quest
April 7, 2008

As readers of this e-zine know, I started out in the book business—first in publicity departments and later as a traveling salesman calling on bookstores, wholesalers and libraries in the East and Midwest. As a salesman, I used to get commissions. As an author of books, I receive royalties. The killer on any commission or royalty statement is the line, “Returns”—unsold books returned to the publisher for credit on which commissions and royalties are deducted. Returns have been the bane of book publishing for more than 70 years. The announcement that HarperCollins will launch a new division that will not accept returns from booksellers

The Vanillafying of America
September 27, 2007

Friday afternoon on MSNBC’s “Hardball,” host Christ Matthews raised this question to two guests: Should the leader of Iran be allowed to speak on Columbia University campus in New York next week?” Radio talk show host Ed Schultz was unequivocal: Absolutely. I think Columbia University is doing this country a favor by getting this guy on American soil, getting him on the record in an academic environment. Let‘s find out what he thinks about Israel. He‘s made all these outlandish comments about the Holocaust on the other side of the world. Let‘s get him on American soil and get him on the record. The thing I

Literary Theft?Pervasive or Avoidable
May 9, 2006

Plagiarism does "not go gentle into that good night."* *Dylan Thomas May 9, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 36 IN THE NEWS Raytheon board cuts CEO pay after book flap ARLINGTON, Va— Raytheon Co.'s board said on Wednesday that it cut its chief executive's compensation in response to what others have called plagiarism in a management booklet, a penalty that one person familiar with the matter said could cost him $1 million. —Jim Wolf, Bill Rigby and Kevin Drawbaugh, Reuters, May 3, 2006 Young Harvard author's book deal canceled NEW YORK — A Harvard University sophomore's