William Randolph Hearst

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

William Randolph Hearst, who had no fear of stretching the truth to its breaking point, would shake his head in amazement if he could see what happens on social media. Sensationalizing newspaper stories to increase circulation has been replaced with controversy-stoking fires designed to increase page views and clicks. Truth in commentary is optional. "Yellow journalism," as it was once called, affects more than website traffic and print circulation. It can be used to alter brand image by manipulating social platforms, search engines and traditional news outlets. If the company doesn't respond or responds poorly, the results can be long lasting and lethal.

The massive leveraged buyout of the Tribune Company by Chicago real estate magnate Sam Zell—the 65th richest man in America according to Forbes, with a personal fortune of $4.5 billion—is in the beginning stages. My bet is that it will result in a tsunami of layoffs, buyouts, firings, and wrecked careers and lives. According to the Jan. 25, 2007 Newstrack, the media industry slashed 17,809 jobs in 2006, an 88% increase over the 9,452 jobs lost the prior year. Last year, we watched The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News fall into the hands of a local consortium of investors that has neither newspaper experience

Just look at ABC and CBS Nov. 22, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 50 IN THE NEWS NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams Pulls Ahead; Widens the Gap Over ABC TO 1.4 Million Viewers NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams had a big ratings win last week, topping ABC's "World News Tonight" by a 16% or +1.390 million viewers - representing the program's best advantage over ABC since the week of the Brokaw/Williams anchor transition (Nov. 29, 2004). --Matt Drudge, The Drudge Report, Nov. 17, 2005 I don't watch one evening news program on television. Rather, I use the remote

Another shameful chapter in The New York Times story comes to an end Nov. 17, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 49 IN THE NEWS Judy Miller Fights Back with Letters to Dowd and Calame NEW YORK--Judith Miller will not go gently into that good night. Her public relations offensive, which had already taken her to CNN with Larry King and to National Public Radio and elsewhere, now includes angry published letters to two of her antagonists, former colleague Maureen Dowd and New York Times Public Editor Barney Calame. --Joe Strupp, Editor & Publisher, Nov. 13, 2005 For us news junkies, the professional demise

By Denny Hatch & Hallie Mummert A brilliant salesman and sales trainer known as Elmer "Sizzle" Wheeler came up with one of the great rules of selling: "You sell the sizzle, not the steak." A few exceptions to this rule exist, one of which is specimen issues of newsletters. A constant topic of debate: Do you send a sample newsletter in your subscription mailing (send the steak)? Or do you talk about it and promise to send a free sample issue with a money-back guarantee (sell the sizzle)? Newsletters typically are only 8 to 12 pages in two-color, so sending the steak in a

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