Walter Weintz

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Peggy Hatch is a senior advisor at NAPCO Media. A direct mail copywriter, she co-founded Who’s Mailing What! with her husband Denny Hatch. Her previous position at NAPCO Media was Group President for the Target Marketing Group.

"The envelope has two purposes and two purposes only," wrote Herschell Gordon Lewis. "One: to get itself opened; Two: to keep the contents from spilling into the street." I received an oversize (5-1/2" x 11-1/") envelope with a shiny 2015 Jefferson nickel showing through the window. How can you not open it?

It was October 1984 when Denny and I launched the premiere issue of Who's Mailing What! Back then, it was a paid newsletter that analyzed direct mail and included a members-only archive service.

Two recent Supreme Court decisions—Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission and McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission—have radically changed the American political landscape and put liberals' knickers in a twist. In the 2012 election, the competing billions—spent by the Democrats and Republicans—for the most part were spent on TV. Policy wonks watch cable news incessantly. The media and Washington insiders take cable news seriously. They consider themselves to be on the cutting edge of defining the issues ultimately controlling the results.

Over the past 55 years—as an employee, freelancer and consultant—I have probably worked for 300 people and companies. I was always hired on a handshake. One of my favorite mentors was the Walter Weintz (pronounced "wents"). Walt frequently used this definition of a consultant: "When you ask your consultant what time it is, he borrows your watch, tells you the time and then keeps the watch.

"Success in direct mail," wrote the legendary guru Ed Mayer many years ago, "is 40 percent lists, 
40 percent offer and 20 percent everything else." On the Internet, lists count the least. Names are so cheap, you can blitz the world practically for free.

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