Susan G. Komen

Melissa Ward is the managing editor for Target Marketing, and she has opinions! More importantly, she's a nerd for great copy and design, a disciple of authenticity, and really loves it when marketers get it right.

According to an article from Mobile Commerce Daily, nonprofit Susan G. Komen incorporated QR Codes into their print ads this year. The code takes users to the nonprofit’s mobile site, where the option to donate is prominently placed on the page. Could this be any more convenient for donors? Or are QR Codes not the right marketing tool for fundraising efforts?

When prospects are still thinking about turkey dinners on Thanksgiving, direct mailers are one step ahead-dropping packages in November and December to stoke holiday activity. In the nonprofit sector, many packages arrive around holiday time, weighed down with freemiums such as gift wrap, gift bags, gift tags, calendars, address labels and stickers, among other items to help prospects with gift giving and ringing in the new year.

With the recession and credit crunch in full swing in November, it didn't seem very likely that credit card marketers would be all that enthusiastic about offering customers, or prospects, a wider variety of choices. Yet, two offers that popped up in the mail show that some were, indeed, quite willing to be flexible. Capital One's letter to a "valued customer"-mailed in a 4-1/2" x 9-1/2" OSE with a "DATED MATERIAL" notice on the front-puts the ball firmly in her court. It simply notes that she is eligible for upgrades to her card account, and directs her to a toll-free number "to tell us which free upgrade option is best for you": more rewards, lower APR or other improvements. No reply forms, buckslips or brochures were used in the crafting of this message (Archive code #550-329024-0811).

With the recession and credit crunch in full swing in November, it didn't seem very likely that credit card marketers would be all that enthusiastic about offering customers, or prospects, a wider variety of choices. Yet, two offers that popped up in the mail show that some were, indeed, quite willing to be flexible. Capital One's letter to a "valued customer"-mailed in a 4-1/2" x 9-1/2" OSE with a "DATED MATERIAL" notice on the front-puts the ball firmly in her court. It simply notes that she is eligible for upgrades to her card account, and directs her to a toll-free number "to tell us which free upgrade option is best for you": more rewards, lower APR or other improvements. No reply forms, buckslips or brochures were used in the crafting of this message (Archive code #550-329024-0811).

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