Steve Jones

Who’s Your Data? is a blog that aims to disseminate thought-provoking tips and techniques involving the use of data and database marketing to direct marketing professionals. Why should you care? Because implementing data best practices has been shown to lift response rates, improve analytics and enhance overall customer experience. Reader participation is encouraged!

Rio Longacre is a Sales & Marketing Professional with more than 10 years of experience in the direct marketing trenches. He has worked closely with businesses across many different vertical markets, helping them effectively leverage the use of data, personalization technologies and tracking platforms. Longacre is currently employed as a Managing Consultant, Marketing, Sales & Service Consulting at Capgemini Consulting, a premier management consulting firm. He is based in the company's New York City office, which is located in Midtown Manhattan. He has also previously worked as an online media buyer and digital marketing strategist.

Email Longacre below, or you can follow him on Twitter at @RioLongacre. Any opinions expressed are his own.

There's quite a bit of talk about Big Data these days across the Web … it's the meme that just won't quit. The reasons why are pretty obvious. Besides a catchy name, Big Data is a real issue faced by virtually every firm in business today. But what's frequently lost in the shuffle is the fact that Big Data is the problem, not the solution. Big Data is what marketers are facing—mountains of unstructured data accumulating on servers and in stacks, across various SaaS tools, in spreadsheets and everywhere else you look in the firm and on the cloud.

Sometimes a band is more than just a band. It's a brand. A new book from Steve Jones titled "Brand Like a Rock Star" makes just that point. Rock stars and bands, like brands, go through a similar process before making it big. They must find their niche, build their following and then stand out from the competition.

By Kate Mason Imagine a typical American golfer. Do you picture an older gentleman playing a pristine, private course, donning plaid pants, while deepening his perpetual, George Hamilton-inspired tan? If so, think again. Who They Are Perhaps surprisingly, the average age of the some 26.4 million U.S. golf enthusiasts is 39 years, and 75 percent of active golfers play on public, not private, courses. "There is a perception that golf has been a game for older, retired men," says Judy Thompson, director of media relations, National Golf Foundation. "But while the typical golfer is male, the average age has been fairly young

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