Steve Case

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

You seek answers to all sorts of questions on the Internet. But how often are the answers relevant or supplied by someone truly in the know? There are often smart responses on Quora, a much buzzed about Silicon Valley social start-up that you'll be hearing a lot more about in the weeks ahead. Quora aims to build a constantly evolving collection of questions and answers that are created, edited and organized by the very people who use the free service.

Readers Respond to “The Decline and Fall of AOL,” published July 13, 2006. I want to share a couple of items to the history of AOL’s success. Jan Brandt left Field Publications as Advertising Director just at the time that Primedia, then K-III Communications, bought Field and included it with the Direct Marketing Group, of which Newbridge Communications (formerly Macmillan Book Clubs) was the anchor. Gryphon Editions was a division of Newbridge. I think the Field acquisition occurred in 1991. I also think Jan went to AOL directly from Field. Newfield, as it was renamed, slowly began to deteriorate. In 1993 K-III’s senior management,

The Magic of the Two-line Address When I was growing up on Long Island, the mailman frequently would deliver an envelope addressed as follows: Mr. Alden Hatch Cedarhurst, New York The letter could come from anywhere in the world and in just two lines—six words—reach my father out of more than 2 billion people on the planet. This never ceased to amaze me. Every son hopes to outdo the father. So when I became a member of AOL, I had a one-line address: dennyhatch@aol.com. Think of it! In this horrendously complex world with 6.5 billion people, I am reachable with one line—17 characters and a dot—from anyplace on earth and

As Time Warner Goes, So Goes TIME IN THE NEWS Despite recent major world events like the London terrorist bombings in July and the late December tsunami in Thailand, newsweeklies continued to struggle for the first half of the year. Time magazine, published by Time Inc., saw circulation remain flat for the period at 4.05 million, while newsstand sales dipped 3.4 percent to 157,217 copies. Newsweek saw its newsstand sales plummet 14 percent to 126,163, while total paid circulation rose 1.8 percent to 1.05 million. --Stephanie D. Smith "ABC: Celeb Titles Enjoy Circ Gains" MEDIAWEEK.COM, Aug. 16, 2005 NEW YORK - Financier Carl Icahn

AOL & The Genius of Jan Brandt By Denny Hatch In 1993, Internet access was essentially a three-horse race. The text-heavy CompuServe was owned by the tax accounting people H&R Block and had about a million members. So did the cartoon-oriented Prodigy, a joint venture among CBS, Sears and IBM. The longshot was America Online (AOL), with its elegant Graphical User Interface (GUI), chat rooms and exclusive community-building techniques, that had been taken public the prior year by founder Steve Case; he had just under 250,000 members and was doing about $40 million a year in revenue. One advantage Case had over the

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