Stephen H. Yu

Stephen H. Yu is a world-class database marketer. He has a proven track record in comprehensive strategic planning and tactical execution, effectively bridging the gap between the marketing and technology world with a balanced view obtained from more than 30 years of experience in best practices of database marketing. Currently, Yu is president and chief consultant at Willow Data Strategy. Previously, he was the head of analytics and insights at eClerx, and VP, Data Strategy & Analytics at Infogroup. Prior to that, Yu was the founding CTO of I-Behavior Inc., which pioneered the use of SKU-level behavioral data. “As a long-time data player with plenty of battle experiences, I would like to share my thoughts and knowledge that I obtained from being a bridge person between the marketing world and the technology world. In the end, data and analytics are just tools for decision-makers; let’s think about what we should be (or shouldn’t be) doing with them first. And the tools must be wielded properly to meet the goals, so let me share some useful tricks in database design, data refinement process and analytics.” Reach him at stephen.yu@willowdatastrategy.com.

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

If I had asked any of my schoolmates what an “algorithm” was, their eyes would have glazed over and they would probably have asked me what I had been smoking. Fast-forward a few decades and we’ve got the algorithmification of everything, including marketing.

Stephen Yu’s recent and extremely thought-provoking piece on AI started me wondering once again about the dangers of data overload and whether we’ll ever really, really understand the purchasing decisions people make, how they make them and be able to track them accurately.

One-dimensional techies will be replaced by machines in the near future. So what if they're the smartest ones in the room? If decision-makers can't use data, does the information really exist?

What is it about these buzzwords that speak to the marketer’s soul? Marketers use emotion to get consumers to buy products and services, so it may stand to reason that marketers use the language among themselves. Buzzwords, after all, tap into emotional centers in the right brain, says Harvard Business School professor Nancy Koehn in a 2014 article in the Atlantic.

The thing about predictive analytics is that the quality of a prediction is eventually exposed — clearly cut as right or wrong. There are casually incorrect outcomes, like a weather report failing to accurately declare at what time the rain will start, and then there are total shockers, like the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

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