Seuss

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

The older I get, the more I realize how smart my mother and Dr. Seuss are. Dr. Seuss may have some crazy rhymes and guys drawn in his books, but if you look at the core of his thoughts and words, the man was brilliant. He can even teach us some nice lessons in regard to social media. 1. "Today you are you, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is youer than you." Authenticity and transparency in social media are the "green" in the green eggs and ham. I like realness, Sam I am!

The idea that advertising agencies are recommending campaigns based on humor—and marketers are going along with it—is an act of desperation. At the end of this issue is an illustration from an upcoming Campbell’s Soup commercial that urges consumers to “Make some holiday magic.” It depicts the branch of an evergreen tree reaching through an open window and grabbing some green bean casserole. The viewer will think, “My isn’t that cute and clever,” and remember the gag, but not the Campbell Soup. Be well-mannered, but don’t be a clown. People don’t buy from bad-mannered salesmen, and research has shown that they don’t buy from

In the 1960s, Grolier Enterprises was run by four dynamos: Founder Elsworth (The Shark) Howell, whose real love was judging dog shows; Vice President Bob Clarke, who started in the Grolier mail room; Vice President of Marketing Ed Bakal, a rough-hewn ex-paratrooper; and Vice President of Creative Lew Smith, a low-key, creative genius. Grolier’s business at the time was selling Dr. Seuss books to kids. The competition was Weekly Reader Book Club and Scholastic’s paperback book clubs, which sold books to students in classrooms through the teacher. Using the Scholastic paperback model, a guy named Joe Archy started the Willie Whale Book Club. Howell watched it

by Alicia Orr Was it fact or rumor, I asked Dan Cirilli, inquiring as to the truth of tales I had heard that he started out in the mail room at Grolier. Cirilli's response: "I grew up in the Bronx and attended the New York School of Printing, a special high school teaching the graphic arts. I then went on to City College at night. It was Robert B. Clarke, an important figure in the history of direct marketing who was executive vice president of Grolier at the time, who hired me, and yes, it was to work in the mail room!" On his

Back In the earlier part of this century, direct marketing didn't even have a name. Over the years, more and more disciples became devoted to this super-focused method of reaching and selling customers; eventually direct marketing drew enough of a following to earn its own professional association and a trade journal. However, only in the past five years has direct marketing fanned out to touch nearly every company across this country—and even the world. For those who started out in this "industry," there weren't any college classes, associations or experts to learn from. No companies ran workshops, seminars or full-blown conferences on creating effective

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