Sarah McBride

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

The dry test is a beautiful thing. If you have an itch to start a magazine, two ways exist to scratch that itch: 1. Dry test. Spend $100,000 to find a universe of likely subscribers, create a direct mail package that makes your magazine so real that people believe it exists, offer three issues free, and see if anybody responds. You won’t know retention, which only comes after the publication has started and readers either love it or are ho-hummed by it. But a dry test will let you see if your idea fogs the mirror. 2. Spend millions starting a magazine and hope someone buys it. A

Think Before You Act Feb. 2, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 9 IN THE NEWS Multimedia Launch of 'Bubble' Gets Mixed Response An experiment in launching a movie almost simultaneously in the cinema, on cable television and on DVD attracted few theater-goers, although the film has done well in DVD orders, according to its makers. —Sarah McBride, The Wall Street Journal, Jan. 30, 2006 In the film world, the time-honored sequence for release of a new movie is theater distribution first, followed by DVDs for purchase and rental, and finally presentation on cable or network TV. "Bubble" is a low-budget thriller directed by

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