Rihanna

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

Luxury buyers are a special breed, so their marketing must be, too. Specialized print, websites and influencers they admire all speak to them in ways that, as a new case study on Brand United puts it, display ads can’t do.

Influencers brands need to know are ones who could help them with their marketing. But the others they must learn about are the ones who are so influential, they could damage their brands with a single post on social media. That’s why Digital Third Coast studied the latter and found 24 such influencers.

Blue hair. Chucks. Jellies. “One-size-fits-most” shirts. Everywhere I go lately, I can’t escape the ’90s. As Hootsuite and BuzzFeed listicles show, nostalgia sells. And marketers know it’s not just Gen Xers buying it.

Beyoncé may be landing on the hot seat along with Airbnb. On Wednesday, Queen Bey was trending on Facebook for singing the praises of Airbnb on Monday in her post about where she stayed during the Super Bowl. At issue: Did the brand pay her for the endorsement? If so, FTC regulations dictate disclosure.

Celebrities are only as good as their fans for brands. While Beyoncé may be the queen of Instagram, notably marketing her self-titled album on the platform, she did so for her own brand. Rihanna, on the other hand, was a huge endorsement win for Jeep. The explanation about this and

More Blogs