Peter Jennings

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

In 2007, ABC News and Charles Gibson squeaked out a victory over Brian Williams on NBC. Both left Katie Couric of CBS a distant third. When Charles Gibson was a host on ABC’s “Good Morning America,” I liked his loosey-goosey, laid-back demeanor and obvious ease as an interviewer in front of the camera and bantering with Diane Sawyer. With the switch to ABC’s “World News Tonight,” where he replaced the urbane, upbeat Peter Jennings, Gibson seems to have purposely changed his “Good Morning America” persona. At first he became the kindly country doctor of my childhood—Hop Allison—who used to make house calls. Lately I

For the last 50 years television news has been the same—men, men, men. From 1949 to 1956 we were treated to the “Camel News Caravan”—a 15-minute news summary hosted by John (“I’m glad we could get together”) Cameron Swayze, who always had an ashtray on his desk and a sign with the sponsor’s logo. This was followed by 15 minutes of Perry Como or Pinkey Lee. Swayze was ousted in October 1956 to make room for the Huntley-Brinkley Report (“Goodnight, Chet; Goodnight, David. And goodnight from NBC News”). These days, the news on the three networks is a tedious and interchangeable compendium of all the

The Whoring of American Journalism Jan. 5, 2006: Vol. 1, Issue No. 58 IN THE NEWS Surgery Journal Threatens Ban For Authors' Hidden Conflicts With conflicts of interest increasingly casting doubt on the credibility of medical research, a leading surgery journal is cracking down on authors who fail to disclose links to industry, threatening to temporarily blacklist them. --David Armstrong, The Wall Street Journal, Dec. 28, 2005 Column Space is Up for Sale The newspaper industry, which has had a worse year than the Eagles, took an embarrassing hit earlier this month when a syndicated columnist for the Copley News Service—someone whose work

The Beginning of the End of the Pharmaceutical Industry? IN THE NEWS A Texas jury dealt Merck a painful blow, finding the drug maker liable for a Vioxx patient's death and slapping it with $253 million in damages. With about 4,200 more Vioxx lawsuits to go, the verdict was an ominous start for Merck. --Mark Gongloff The Evening Wrap The Wall Street Journal (wsj.com), Aug. 19, 2005, 5:20 p.m. EDT "If you represent yourself in a court of law," the old adage goes, "you have a fool for a client." A law firm that

August 9, 2005, Vol. 1, Issue No. 20 The Passing of Peter Jennings And How I nearly met Humphrey Bogart IN THE NEWS NEW YORK -- Peter Jennings, the suave, Canadian-born broadcaster who delivered the news to Americans each night in five separate decades, died yesterday. He was 67. --David Bauder The Associated Press, August 8, 2005 I never met Peter Jennings in person, but my wife, Peggy, and I watched him nightly for many years. At one point, ABC News had a trio of anchors reporting from around the country--Jennings, Frank Reynolds and Max Robinson. As I recall, Reynolds, a splendid journalist,

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