Paul Goldberg

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

On Nov. 22, 1963, consultant Paul Goldberg—with a huge mailing for Consumer Reports going out across the country—was having lunch with two colleagues at the Café Carlyle in New York. The maître d' came over to the table to report that President Kennedy had been shot.

Copywriters empathize. They are highly paid to get inside the heads of those to whom they are writing. Copywriters think how their prospects and customers think and feel what they feel. Politicians have the hides of a rhinoceros. Their overarching agenda: re-election at all costs.

When the 9/11 terrorists struck, airport security changed dramatically. Travelers were urged to get to the airport four hours in advance of their flights. A month later, I had to be in Chicago for the DMA convention. I wasn't scared of flying. With the increased security, this was probably the safest time to fly in the history of commercial aviation. However, I opted not to go through the airport check-in mayhem and instead bought round-trip Amtrak passage with a sleeping compartment.

Many times over the past seven decades, I have met ambitious young men and women who wanted to leave the corporate rat race and go off on their own. The idea of working like hell for five years only to have your business tank is not a pretty thought. I'm a guy who started two businesses (the WHO'S MAILING WHAT! newsletter with my wife Peggy and a freelance copy and design service). Both are still going 25 years later.

On Nov. 22, 1963, consultant Paul Goldberg—with a huge mailing for Consumer Reports going out across the country—was having lunch with two colleagues at the Café Carlyle in New York. The maître d' came over to the table to report that President Kennedy had been shot.

Our friends Jack and Evie retired to Cape Cod 15 years ago, and two years ago decided to subscribe to the Cape Cod Times. It's a good paper, with all the local goings-on and one of the best sports sections I have ever seen. Jack's deal: $38.40 every six weeks. The bill would come and Jack would faithfully send a check. At the end of the most recent six-week period, Jack got a bill for the following amount: 26 weeks for $158.60.

 

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