Oprah

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Influencers brands need to know are ones who could help them with their marketing. But the others they must learn about are the ones who are so influential, they could damage their brands with a single post on social media. That’s why Digital Third Coast studied the latter and found 24 such influencers.

Celebrities are only as good as their fans for brands. While Beyoncé may be the queen of Instagram, notably marketing her self-titled album on the platform, she did so for her own brand. Rihanna, on the other hand, was a huge endorsement win for Jeep. The explanation about this and

During Kirstine Stewart‘s keynote at Tuesday’s Digital Day 3D in Toronto, the head of Twitter Canada addressed everything from the notion of Twitter “disrupting” the TV space (she says it’s not) to how Canadian celebrities are doing well on the platform (hello, Justin Bieber, with your 46 million followers). She also discussed how brands are—and could be—using Twitter to further connect with consumers through conversation. We know you’re already well-acquainted with the basics about the platform that’s known as the digital watercooler, so here are a few things from Stewart’s presentation that you may not know about the platform—or Stewart

If you’ve spent any time at all on Twitter and Facebook during the last week or so, you’ve undoubtably heard about KONY2012. The campaign by the nonprofit advocacy group Invisible Children centered around Joseph Kony, the Ugandan warlord and leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, a guerrilla group with a long and violent history that includes the kidnapping of children. With striking and dramatic imagery and Hollywood-style editing, the campaign video presents an utterly compelling message in the age of “social” media: by simply clicking “share,” you can make a difference in the world. And “share” the world did …

"As teenagers' scores on standardized reading tests have declined or stagnated, some argue that the hours spent prowling the Internet are the enemy of reading-diminishing literacy, wrecking attention spans and destroying a precious common culture that exists only through the reading of books," writes Motoko Rich in The New York Times. "But others say the Internet has created a new kind of reading, one that schools and society should not discount."

I believe this so-called "new kind of reading" is the result of the old kind of writing, which has become really bad.

I'm talking about the writing in mainstream media-newspapers, magazines and books-whose managements are so financially strapped that they can't afford decent editors. The result: Authors left to themselves are sloppy, self-indulgent and frequently boring as dirt.

This is also true of writing on the Internet and BlackBerrys/other mobile devices.

Let’s get this out on the table right now—I love junk mail. Compared to spam—the ultimate time sucker—a little daily junk mail (which can be opened over the recycling bin) is dream stuff. And. by the way, I love the term, “junk mail.” Years back, any mention of the term “junk mail” in the media brought huffy letters from members of the direct marketing community demanding an apology from the offender. When the great West Coast copywriter, the late Bill Jayme, was asked what he did for a living. “I write direct mail solicitations for magazines,” he said, “such as Atlantic Monthly, BusinessWeek, Civilization, American Heritage and many

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