Mark Zuckerberg

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.
Thorin McGee is editor-in-chief and content director of Target Marketing and oversees editorial direction and product development for the magazine, website and other channels.

As many of us sit at home, we have a unique opportunity to do some out-of-the-box disruption planning about our business, and perhaps, even our personal goals. It isn’t easy, but it is necessary.

It’s no coincidence that Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter, announced that his platform would ban political ads less than an hour before Facebook’s much-anticipated Q3 earnings call. It wasn’t the first time that a competitor made a business decision that forced a company to either follow suit or defend its position.

Advertisers may not care that President Donald Trump uses Twitter like a broadcast channel, creating news by posting on the social media platform. Or that Twitter Co-Founder and CEO Jack Dorsey announced banning all political ads. But they should. And here’s why.

One of TikTok's Gen Z users told marketers at a marketing conference that their ads wouldn’t work on the social media platform, because users won’t pay attention. While marketer after marketer proves that statement false, marketers do need to worry about authenticity before they consider success measurements.

Recently, during a live stream of Facebook’s weekly internal Q&A meeting, Mark Zuckerberg shared, “I do such a bad job at interviews.” When the CEO of a company with a market cap of over $500 billion admits that he does a poor job at press interviews, it makes you wonder: What makes for a good brand spokesperson?

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