Louis Rukeyser

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

The following is the full list of Grand Controls identified by the Who's Mailing What! Archive as having been mailed for three years or more during the past decade (1995-2004). For more information on any of these mailings, contact Archive Director Paul Bobnak, at (215) 238-5225. Or, to order access to the entire direct mail library of mailings received by the Archive between 1994 and the present, visit www.whosmailingwhat.com. AARP Membership Registration Archive Code: 571AMASRP0604Z AARP Membership Card Archive Code: 571AMASRP0397A AARP Certificate of Admission Archive Code: 573AMASRP1095AZ Advertising Age Year/$69.95 Archive Code: 205ADAGEM0799Z Air & Space 5 + 1

In a weak market for financial-newsletter publishers, Louis Rukeyser's Wall Street has found a way to engage potential readers and keep subscriptions streaming in. In July, the Who's Mailing What! Archive received the current acquisition control for Rukeyser's, an 8-1/2" x 11", four-color, 30-page magalog effort that offers prospects a one-year deal for $33.50 or a two-year deal for $67, plus five free investment special reports (270LORUWS0704). The package represents a slight shift in direct marketing strategy for the publication, as it had long mailed 8-1/2" x 11" issue-logs, or "faux issues," that only employed two-color process. The cover of this particular effort features

As of publication time, leading economical groups were declaring the United States to be in a recession. Only weeks ago the former president George Bush told attendees to the 84th Annual DMA Conference that the tools were in place for economic recovery, and that a recession was not likely. On the bright side, economists also are predicting that the recession will last until only mid-2002—but can anyone really know what will happen? What a headache it must be right now for marketers of financial magazines and newsletters. These publications routinely make economic predictions in their direct mail efforts, but

by Denny Hatch If any organization has put a stamp on modern direct mail, it's not the U.S.Postal Service, but rather the recently retired, two-man creative team of Pittsburgh-born freelance copywriter Bill Jayme and Finnish designer Heikki Ratalahti. In a four-decade partnership, their stylish direct mail solicitations launched some three dozen magazines including New York, Smithsonian, Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Cooking Light, Air & Space, Louis Rukeyser's Wall Street, Worth, Saveur, Tufts Nutrition Letter, Mother Jones and the Harvard Medical School Health Letter. In their heyday, Jayme-Ratalahti had a five-month queue of publishers and circulation managers, hats in hand, ready to pony

by Denny Hatch A direct mail format that has always baffled me is the magalog—that curious 81⁄2˝ x 11˝ booklet that is a cross between a magazine and a catalog. The very first magalog was a self-mailer written by freelancer Dick Sanders and designed by freelancer William Fridrich in the mid-1980s for Dick Fabian's Telephone Switch Newsletter. Sanders' sales letters kept getting longer and longer, and he kept wanting to make them longer still. At the same time, the creative team felt the need to break up the information. Clearly a new format was needed, and since Fabian had done a self-mailer,

The envelope is the first place to start when considering testing. Why? Every recipient sees it—and it affects whether recipients ever get to the rest of the mailing. It is also a relatively easy test. Additionally, there are many different types of envelope tests to try. Here are a few to consider. Teaser copy "The outer envelope is the headline of direct mail."—Ed Nash One technique used to geet a prospect to open the envelope is to entice them to want to know more. Teasers do just that. This technique has been successfully used by publishers to whet the reader's appetite to not

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