Joseph Turow

Peter J. Rosenwald is an expat American living and working in Brazil; founder and first CEO of Wunderman Worldwide, International Division of Wunderman agency) and first chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi Direct Worldwide; strategist and senior executive in charge of building subscription and data-driven marketing for Editora Abril, Latin America's leading magazine publisher; founder of Consult Partners, active strategic marketing consultancy working in Brazil, U.S. and U.K. International keynote speaker on data-driven marketing and author of "Accountable Marketing" (Thomson), "Profiting From the Magic of Marketing Metrics" (Direct Marketing IQ), and "GringoView" blog author for Brazilian Huffington Post. With an international perspective, my blog's purpose is to share my maverick views of this business I've spent the last half-century working in, enjoying and observing.

Chet Dalzell’s recent thoughtful piece on “Our Digital Selves” came along at the same time I (and probably a gazillion others) were pondering the increasingly pressing question of data privacy in the digital age.

For years, state Democratic parties have been gathering information about individual voters' political leanings. They have noted down the opinions voters shared with canvassers—which candidates they said they supported or their positions on policy issues. Now, the record of what people told Democratic volunteers may go up for sale—and not just to political groups. Democrats are looking into whether credit card companies, retailers like Target or other commercial interests may want to buy the information. State Democratic party leaders formed the National Voter File Co-op in 2011 to sell their voter data to approved groups like the NAACP. The goal

The idea of targeted marketing isn’t exactly a groundbreaking concept; it’s why you see makeup and clothing ads in Cosmopolitan, not ESPN The Magazine. However, the fact that the tactic has moved into the digital space, where marketers can track with intense precision everything from eye movement to the amount of spent time on a page, continues to raise an enormous amount of concern, especially among the thought leaders who are smart enough to pinpoint how this tactic works. In a recent interview, University of Pennsylvania communication professor Joseph Turow discussed the issue of marketers gaining access

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