John Potter

Facing increasing losses and the prospect of no postal rate increase this year, the U.S. Postal Service announced plans to cut VP-level jobs by 16% and close its Southeast regional office in an effort to trim costs. The reorganization is the first significant move to address the service's financial woes by new Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe. Donahoe took over from John Potter, who retired in early December. The number of VP-level officers will be reduced from 44 to 37, according to USPS. Also to be eliminated is the Memphis, Tenn.-based Southeast regional office, which has 119 employees. The

Postage rates will increase in 2011, with first-class stamps rising from 44 cents to 46 cents starting in January, pending approval by the Postal Regulatory Commission, the US Postal Service announced Tuesday. It is the latest in a series of cost-cutting, revenue-raising moves the USPS has made as it confronts plummeting service, out-of-control health-care and pension costs, and a massive budget deficit. After only three rate changes in the 1990s, the Postal Service has boosted rates for domestic letters on since 2000, including five separate increases in the past five years. Postcard rates will also go

The U.S. Postal Service ended the third quarter of fiscal year 2010 (April 1 – June 30) with a net loss of $3.5 billion, compared with a net loss of $2.4 billion for the same quarter last year. Third-quarter mail volume totaled 40.9 billion pieces – down approximately 700 million pieces, or 1.7 percent, compared to a year ago. Complete USPS third-quarter results include operating revenue of $16 billion, some $294 million less

The end of Saturday mail delivery gets closer to reality in the next 10 days, as Postmaster General John E. Potter plans to formally present his proposals to his board of directors and postal regulators. Letter carriers would stop delivering mail to American homes and businesses and would not pick up mail from blue collection boxes on Saturdays, according to Potter.

Founded in 1988, the Mailers Council is the largest coalition of mailers and mailing associations in the U.S. Collectively, its members account for more than 70 percent of all mail, and they are primarily interested in ensuring a future for the Postal Service. With that future increasingly in peril, I spoke with Mailers Council Executive Director Robert E. McLean. He meets frequently with Postmaster General John Potter and his senior officers about mailers’ concerns, which include making sure postage remains affordable for mailers and focusing on policy issues at the highest levels. Just before this interview, he testified at a House of Representatives Postal Oversight Subcommittee hearing.

Founded in 1988, the Mailers Council is the largest coalition of mailers and mailing associations in the U.S. Collectively, its members account for more than 70 percent of all mail, and they are primarily interested in ensuring a future for the Postal Service. With that future increasingly in peril, I spoke with Mailers Council Executive Director Robert E. McLean. He meets frequently with Postmaster General John Potter and his senior officers about mailers' concerns, which include making sure postage remains affordable for mailers and focusing on policy issues at the highest levels. Just before this interview, he testified at a House of Representatives Postal Oversight Subcommittee hearing.

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