Jock Bickert

Marketers Need to Prepare Now For The Aging of The Baby Boom—Or Risk Losing Out on a Huge Opportunity By Alicia Orr Suman Between 1946 and 1964 in the post-WWII population bubble called the baby boom, 76 million Americans were born. In 2006, the baby boom will turn 60, and the leading edge of the baby boom generation will approach retirement and "senior" status. According to a new AARP study, Boomers at Midlife: The AARP Life Stage Study, boomers are drawn together by their collective experiences. As members of one of the largest generations in American history, they've experienced Vietnam and Watergate, the

Industry experts get serious about privacy, postage, telemarketing and more. Reported by Paul Barbagallo, Brian Howard & Hallie Mummert Privacy. The U.S. Postal Service. Telemarketing. Congress. These four topics dominated the discussion at Target Marketing's Business Outlook 2003 breakfast, held during the Direct Marketing Association conference in San Francisco in October. We gathered a distinguished panel of industry experts to outline the major issues direct marketers will face next year, and found that the more the industry changes, the more it stays the same. When Target Marketing convened a roundtable seven years ago to discuss the future of direct marketing, we gnashed teeth over

By Alicia Orr Suman Spring 1978. The first issue of ZIP magazine hit the mail. And on the cover of that predecessor to this magazine were the faces of men and women—"Some Leaders in the Direct Marketing Field," stated the headline. The features listed in the Table of Contents of that premier issue (right) have an eerie resemblance to the subjects we now cover 25 years later: • What Is the Future of the Postal Service? • Personal Privacy in an Information Society • Facsimile Machines, For the Office of the Future • Computer Networks: The New Information Robots • Alternate Delivery: Post-Mortem for

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