Jack Welch

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

US News and World Report recently pointed to Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management as the nation’s top educational institution for aspiring marketers. Among the likes of Penn, Harvard, Stanford, and Columbia, what makes Northwestern’s program stand out from the crowd?

Since the beginning of time to this very moment, we humans have been driven by purpose. Consciously and unconsciously, we seek meaning in our lives and the need to actively make a difference and leave a personal legacy of good when we move on from this existence. Jung addresses this in his Individuation process and so, too, do modern and past psychologists and researchers of human behavior drivers.

When I saw that the 2008 rate for a speech by Larry Summers was $45,000 to $135,000, I got to thinking.

Out of curiosity, I started prowling the various Web sites of speakers' bureaus and came to six conclusions:

  1. It seems everybody in the world is available for speeches. Included are political and show business stars, second and third bananas, and hundreds upon hundreds of people I never heard of.
  2. All of these people—luminaries and nobodies—get fees from $1,000 to $1 million, plus expenses.
  3. I used to make a lot of speeches, and all I ever got was expenses and a plaque with my name engraved on it.
  4. I was a damned fool. I was as much a nobody as anybody else and could've picked up some dough if I'd just asked.
  5. If someone invites you to make a speech, think about asking for an honorarium at the very least, if not a fat fee, plus expenses. For Colin Powell, expenses include a private jet along with his $100,000 fee.
  6. The worst that can happen is that no money in the budget exists for fees or expenses. If you refuse, someone will replace you.

The End of Media Decorum March 14, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 20 IN THE NEWS Scandal minister Profumo dies at 91 John Profumo, the man at the centre of the most notorious political sex scandal of the 20th century, has died at the age of 91 after suffering a stroke. Profumo, who spent four decades atoning for his disgrace, died peacefully at about midnight last night surrounded by his family, a spokesman for London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital said. He had been admitted to hospital two days earlier. —The Independent, (UK), Online Edition, March 10, 2006 John Profumo, the central

by Don Jackson The date: Nov. 10, 1999. The time: 16:52 Eastern Standard Time. The headline: "Allstate Announces New Business Approach Including Direct and Internet Sales." Now in the world of insurance marketing, and insurance direct marketing specifically, this qualifies as a momentous strategic initiative. After all, Allstate Corp. is the nation's largest publicly held personal lines insurance company. With the exception of State Farm Mutual Insurance Co., it writes more property and casualty (P&C) business than any other company in the United States. Allstate is number two, and apparently it is going to "try harder." "Try harder" to capture an increased

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