Jack Dorsey

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

Jessica Nable's blog is focused on how companies can manage and improve their corporate reputation. With over 15 years of corporate, B2B, financial services, and technology communications experience, Nable is an experienced senior strategic communications consultant who helps organizations build deeper relationships with press, clients and prospects, current and prospective employees, and lawmakers. Reach her at jessica.nable@gmail.com and connect with her on LinkedIn. 

It’s no coincidence that Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter, announced that his platform would ban political ads less than an hour before Facebook’s much-anticipated Q3 earnings call. It wasn’t the first time that a competitor made a business decision that forced a company to either follow suit or defend its position.

Advertisers may not care that President Donald Trump uses Twitter like a broadcast channel, creating news by posting on the social media platform. Or that Twitter Co-Founder and CEO Jack Dorsey announced banning all political ads. But they should. And here’s why.

A bird in hand is worth two clicks in an e-commerce site? Word is Twitter's "buy now" buttons are visible on some tweets, allowing marketers to have a consumer's first click be the last one. This, along with its pending online payment firm partnership and mobile re-targeting tech company purchase, makes it look like Twitter is planning a big e-commerce future.

Twitter had a strong public stock debut Thursday in the most highly anticipated initial public offering since Facebook's last year. But one risk investors face is Twitter burnout. Twitter is trading under the ticker symbol "TWTR." Twitter's stock opened at $45.10, or 73 percent above its $26 IPO price. The opening price values Twitter at more than $31 billion based on its outstanding stock, options and restricted stock that'll be available after the IPO. Expect some changes throughout the day, though: It has traded as high as $50.09 and is now at $45.97.

Twitter has taken the cover off its initial public offering, making public its prospectus and setting the clock on one of the most anticipated stock sales of the year. Twitter’s prospectus—whose filing was initially disclosed in a 135-character post on its own service last month—offers the fullest look yet at the privately held company. The company’s growth has been smaller than anticipated. It reported 215 million average monthly users. Twitter reported revenue of $317 million in 2012, and $253 million for the first six months of this year. The social network disclosed it plans to use the ticker symbol “TWTR,”

Big changes are coming to Twitter's "brand pages," the landing pages it offers to some marketers who also spend ad dollars on the network. Launched in December, the pages show the brand's Twitter feed and images, but Twitter plans to add experiences, including e-commerce, contests and sweepstakes, according to three executives familiar with the matter. The product will allow app developers to build experiences on Twitter, much the way they do on Facebook. The features will be contained within the brand's tweet timeline, a departure from the 140-character limit of a tweet or images and videos that can now …

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