Henry Luce

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

A catalog that keeps dead brands alive—memories of your grandparents' childhood—is Voice of the Mountains, published by the Vermont Country Store. Among the stuff they sell: Wooden Pick-up Sticks, The Original 1935 Monopoly Game, Zud Heavy Duty Cleanser Powder. Plus slews more oldies and goodies

On Friday, October 12 my wife, Peggy, and I took the overnight train out of Washington’s Union Station bound for Chicago and the Direct Marketing Association conference and exhibition. The following Wednesday, we flew home: Up at 5:30 a.m.; traffic jam during the taxi ride to O’Hare; hefting our bags to check-in at US Airways; being treated like terrorists by screeners; calorie-laden breakfast at Chili’s with plastic eating utensils; two hours in the crowded waiting room amidst loud cell phone yappers; middle seats in a sealed aluminum tube and hurled at 500 mph across the country for two hours; exit madness with apprehension over the

The idea that Bostonians would wake up one morning and find out that the Ritz-Carlton Boston was suddenly the Taj Boston is astonishing. Built in 1927, the Ritz-Carlton was to Boston what the Plaza was to New York; the Palmer House was to Chicago; and the Adams Mark was (and is) to San Francisco—a home away from home that offered unmatched elegance, service and ambiance. I’ll take it one step further: perpetual perfection. The motto of the Ritz-Carlton staff: “We are ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen.” A second Ritz-Carlton exists in Boston. But if you Google “The Ritz-Carlton Boston,” the following is

The City Hall food police are planning to outlaw the use of trans fatty acids in all 24,600 New York City eating establishments, in many cases turning their businesses upside down. It’s possible that new studies will show that trans fatty acids actually cure a boatload of diseases, just as recent research has turned the food pyramid on its ear, discounted the benefits of low fat and vegan diets, shot down vitamin supplements and shown that slightly overweight people live longer. It’s a topsy-turvy, fast changing world we have to deal with. The Good Old Days In business, the only thing I miss more than a two-martini lunch

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