Groucho Marx

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Hotels.com is a good service for a lot of reasons. Alas, the current TV ad campaign is an exercise in smartypants stupidity. The new spokesman—Captain Obvious—is a costumed, brash boob without one scintilla of charm or class.

For some reason, we don’t get Fox Movies on DIRECTV, so I have never seen the “Fox Legacy” series. But when I read about Fox Filmed Entertainment Chairman Tom Rothman making a name for himself as host of that series—acquiring a cult following and a ton of fan mail, including a note from Steven Spielberg—I chuckled to myself. In a world of simply terrible presenters and speechmakers, it’s a delight to come across someone that is really good. The Myth of PowerPoint The 10th issue of this e-zine, back in July 2005, was titled, “Power Corrupts, PowerPoint Corrupts Absolutely”—a quote by Edward Tufte,

In the mid-1950s, when I was attending Columbia College, I worked nights and weekends as a page at NBC in New York. In those days, television was black-and-white and always live. After squeezing fat tourists into thin seats, we pages were free to watch the show—from the back of the studio audience, the stage door or the control room. During those three years, I must have seen, in person, every major and minor star in the NBC galaxy, as well as those from other networks and Hollywood, since we also were assigned to work the Academy Awards and the Emmys. I was able to

Another shameful chapter in The New York Times story comes to an end Nov. 17, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 49 IN THE NEWS Judy Miller Fights Back with Letters to Dowd and Calame NEW YORK--Judith Miller will not go gently into that good night. Her public relations offensive, which had already taken her to CNN with Larry King and to National Public Radio and elsewhere, now includes angry published letters to two of her antagonists, former colleague Maureen Dowd and New York Times Public Editor Barney Calame. --Joe Strupp, Editor & Publisher, Nov. 13, 2005 For us news junkies, the professional demise

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