George S. Patton

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

From Warren Buffett’s Stunning Video Testimonial
I have to tell you I now have nine suits all made in China; I threw away the rest of my suits. Our directors, my partner Charlie Munger, Walter Scott, Ron Olson and even Bill Gates now, are wearing suits made by Dayang Trands. And they know and love Madam Li for what she’s accomplished. As a matter of fact I think maybe Bill Gates and I should start a men’s clothing store and sell the suits made by Madam Li. I think we would be great salesmen, because we love them so much. The suits we’ve received that have been made in China we’ve never had to alter a quarter of an inch. They fit perfectly. We get compliments on them. It’s been a long time since I got compliments on how I looked. But since I’m wearing Madam Li’s suits I get compliments all the time. So maybe Bill and I can start a clothing store. And if we sold the suits made by Dayang Trands someday we might even be rich, who knows.

Warren Buffett's testimonial on the 30th anniversary of Madam Li Guilian’s company was released over The Wall Street Journal’s digital network on Sept. 10 as a YouTube-type video. Dalian Dayang Trands Co. stock jumped 70%.

Because I work at home, I haven't bought a new suit in five years. After that endorsement, I lusted after a Trands suit.

No dice. They're available only at the 20 Trands stores in China—mostly in secondary cities, the brand wasn't even widely known in China—or by mail to the very rich who know the owner, Madam Li, and have access to a great fitter.

What we're looking at is not only the greatest testimonial in the history of the world, but also a marketing opportunity that gives me the tingles.

As readers of last Thursday’s edition may remember, my wife Peggy and I are back from Normandy and a three-day immersion in World War II and D-Day—a journey I have wanted to take for five decades. I wish I had a week. Coming home to the story of General Petraeus appointing the new crop of Army generals was unsettling. In World War II, America’s top generals in Europe were world-class—George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton Jr. and Omar N. Bradley to name four. Every now and again, fantastic images cross my brain. For example, if we could bring J.S. Bach back

Whenever things go wrong and I get depressed, my wife Peggy says, “Cheer up, nobody is shooting at us.” I used to know Francey Smith, who ran the Bloomingdale’s catalog for years. She was a marketing genius who combined database wizardry with great merchandising savvy. She was one of the best in the world at what she did. Now the Bloomingdale’s catalog, which has been around since 1886, is being killed off by Macy’s. It has an active file of 472,609 12-month mail-order buying households. A ballpark estimate would be that each household has an average of four people, which means a total of

Last March it was announced that New Century—a giant lender of subprime mortgages—was going out of business, followed in August by the Chapter 11 of American Home Mortgage. Many economists predicted that this subprime debacle had a long fuse. On October 24, 2007 came the announcement that Merrill Lynch was forced to take an $8.4 billion hit in the third quarter caused by a revaluing of the bonds backed by subprime mortgages. Merrill Lynch stock fell 5.8%, its credit rating was downgraded and the overall loss for the quarter was $2.4 billion. Last August 23rd, this e-zine took off on the subprime mortgage crash.

“Whoever you are, I have always depended on the kindness of strangers.” —Blanche DuBois, Tennessee Williams’s, “A Streetcar Named Desire.” “Dreamgirls” is boffo. My wife, Peggy, and I saw it in a neighborhood movie house where the audience is often restless, rattles popcorn bags and talks back to the screen. For the entire duration of this film the theater was dead silent. At the end of the Jennifer Hudson love song that devolved into a heart-wrenching soliloquy, we all applauded. The drama within this magical musical is all the more poignant when you discover that Jennifer Hudson was bounced from “American Idol.”

Note: Denny Hatch responds to all correspondence. Readers respond to “Three 800-Pound Guerrillas” published Aug. 8, 2006, which compared the war in Iraq to the General Motors business model. I enjoyed the “800 Pound Guerilla” piece today and I feel compelled to comment. The unfortunate truth of our current situation is that almost everybody knew it would turn out this way, but nobody had the guts to admit it. Ego and greed have always been, and will always be man’s downfall and those are the two key reasons for our involvement. I appreciate you having the courage to discuss the war in your newsletter.

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