George Clooney

Stephen H. Yu is a world-class database marketer. He has a proven track record in comprehensive strategic planning and tactical execution, effectively bridging the gap between the marketing and technology world with a balanced view obtained from more than 30 years of experience in best practices of database marketing. Currently, Yu is president and chief consultant at Willow Data Strategy. Previously, he was the head of analytics and insights at eClerx, and VP, Data Strategy & Analytics at Infogroup. Prior to that, Yu was the founding CTO of I-Behavior Inc., which pioneered the use of SKU-level behavioral data. “As a long-time data player with plenty of battle experiences, I would like to share my thoughts and knowledge that I obtained from being a bridge person between the marketing world and the technology world. In the end, data and analytics are just tools for decision-makers; let’s think about what we should be (or shouldn’t be) doing with them first. And the tools must be wielded properly to meet the goals, so let me share some useful tricks in database design, data refinement process and analytics.” Reach him at stephen.yu@willowdatastrategy.com.

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

I recently bought a Nespresso coffee machine because George Clooney is its brand ambassador. I figured if I could even get 10 percent of his charm by drinking Nespresso, the investment would be worth it. After a week, I asked my wife if she noticed any changes. After a short moment of evaluation, she kindly responded, “I think you need to give it more time but also hang on to the receipt.”

With light shining on the dark crevices where sexual assault and harassment stories are covered up, many women — as well as some men — are revealing that they’ve survived peril with the #metoo hashtag. And if brands don’t have anything good to say about this, then they shouldn’t say anything at all, says a crisis communications firm.

Don't do it just because you can. No kidding. … Any geek with moderate coding skills or any overzealous marketer with access to some data can do real damage to real human beings without any superpowers to speak of. Largely, we wouldn't go so far as calling them permanent damages, but I must say that some marketing messages and practices are really annoying and invasive. Enough to classify them as "junk mail" or "spam." Yeah, I said that, knowing full-well that those words are forbidden in the industry in which I built my career.

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