Franklin D. Roosevelt

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

One of the most shadowy, behind-the-scenes characters of recent history was a sixth cousin of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a plain little spinster lady named Margaret (Daisy) Suckley (rhymes with “book-lee”), whose Hudson River mansion is being renovated. Suckley died in 1991 in her 100th year. For years she maintained she had nothing to add to what had been written about Roosevelt and his presidency. But when her house was cleaned out, a suitcase of letters was found under her bed, and to the astonishment of historians and family members, Suckley and Roosevelt had a long-term and very close relationship. Although the words are

On June 6, 2006, I devoted these pages to the tectonic change in the CBS Evening News. The piece was titled “WOMEN TAKE OVER AT LAST! With Couric and Logan on Board at CBS, Maybe the Evening News Will Come Alive.” With CBS paying Couric $15 million a year and spending $2.9 million for a new set, I had high hopes that she and her electric, articulate chief foreign correspondent, Lara Logan, would bury their tedious male competitors. Alas, a year later the program is moribund, with lower ratings than those garnered by temporary anchor Bob Schieffer. In a fascinating 6,300-word analysis of Couric—including

From 1920 to 1933, Henry L. Stimson was secretary of state in the Hoover administration. In 1929, he closed down the State’s cryptanalytic office and his quote about gentlemen not reading each other’s mail became famous. Fortunately he changed his mind when he headed the War Department under Franklin D. Roosevelt. Had the United States not broken the Japanese code in the early years of World War II, tens of thousands of American lives would have been lost. The same is true for the Brits intercepting German radio traffic with the now-famous Enigma machines at Bletchley Park. Down deep inside, I agree with Stimson; snooping

“Businesses based on theft are falling by the wayside or going legit, and a legal marketplace is showing real signs of promise,” wrote Mitch Bainwol, chairman and CEO, Recording Industry Association of America, and Dan Glickman, chairman and CEO, Motion Picture Association of America, in The Wall Street Journal on July 1. Maybe in the world of DVDs, CDs and software. The genteel world of book publishing is another story. Sure, the Harry Potter books have been counterfeited and are selling across Asia. But I was stunned to find that an obscure book written 50 years ago by my father, that’s still under copyright, was appropriated

Looking at the New Breed of Bankers May 25, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 41 IN THE NEWS Internet banks draw raves Many like the convenience and higher interest rates, but it's not for everyone. NEW YORK--Higher interest rates initially drove Nick Sayers to the Bank of Internet. But he soon realized it's more convenient, too. Sayers, 26, a private-equity investor in Chicago, is one of a growing number of Americans ditching their neighborhood brick-and-mortar accounts. Others are moving the bulk of their money to virtual banks like Bank of Internet, which can offer better rates because they don't have to

22 Candidates for Mayor of New Orleans? Preposterous! April 25, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 32 IN THE NEWS Nagin, Landrieu in New Orleans Runoff With 85 percent of precincts reporting, Nagin topped all candidates with 37 percent or 25,954 votes. Landrieu had 29 percent, or 20,274 votes. Nonprofit executive Ron Forman followed with 18 percent, 12,503 votes, and 19 other candidates trailed far behind. —Michelle Roberts, Associated Press Writer, The GuardianUnlimited (UK), April 23, 2006 In 1945, my father, historian and biographer Alden Hatch, was signed by Henry Holt & Co. to write a biography of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. He

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