F. Scott Fitzgerald

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Ernest Hemingway is one of the best writers of all time, but a great content marketer? Sure, Hemingway wasn’t out to warm up leads or sell a product. (Well, maybe books.) Still, Hemingway’s writing process reveals great tips for content marketing. Below we suggest some words of wisdom from Hemingway you can apply to your content marketing process. 1. Don’t Over Think It “…I learned not to think about anything I was writing from the time I stopped writing until I started again the next day.”

As I get older—and my time on this planet gets shorter—I go berserk when people promise one thing in writing, deliver something else and waste my time.

At right "IN THE NEWS" is the lede of Howard Shapiro's review of "Death of a Salesman" by Arthur Miller at the University of Delaware, roughly an hour's drive from my house in center city Philadelphia.  

I wanted to know one thing quickly: was this production worth the trip?

Of the 403-word review, the first 88 words are devoted to the excruciatingly dull details of how Shapiro got stuck in stop-and-go 8 mph traffic that caused him to miss Act I.

Shapiro spends the next 94 words dumping all over Arthur Miller's first act—which he has not seen:

Ah, yes, the babbling, daydreaming Willy Loman, aging badly from a hard life of sales on the road, is in his Brooklyn house, frightening his wife with his erratic behavior. He's also yelling at his grown boysparticularly Biff, who had been Willy's great hope and now is his constant disappointment.

In all, 182 words—or 45 percent of this supposed review—are expended (1) highlighting Howard Shapiro's self-described inability to keep an appointment and (2) wasting my time.

Shapiro and his editor—if such an animal exists in the bankrupt Philadelphia Inquirer—should be fired for letting this irrelevant drivel see print.

My message to Howard Shapiro—and to everyone that writes for public consumption (as opposed to private diaries or journals):

  • Consider the readers needs and wants before your own
  • Ruthlessly self-edit, because most businesses do not have professional editors.

The story of Warren McDowell, publisher of The Fire Island Journal, delivering 6,000 copies of his semi-weekly newspaper by boat to the retailers of that summer resort grabbed me. Fire Island is a quirky barrier island off Long Island’s South Shore, 32 miles long and half a mile wide. Cars are not permitted on the island. The only way to get there is by ferry, private boat or swimming. The wheeled vehicles of choice are kids’ wagons that carry everything—your luggage, groceries, dry cleaning and babies. Sure, the publisher could get a permit for a delivery truck to drive the beach. But this

What Republicans can learn from Warren Buffett Nov. 1, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 44 IN THE NEWS US Death Toll in Iraq Reaches 2,000 BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN)--The U.S. military death toll in Iraq reached 2,000 Tuesday with the reports of three new deaths, and President Bush prepared the nation for more casualties, saying the "defense of freedom is worth our sacrifice. --CNN.com, Oct. 26, 2005 Miers Withdraws Nomination President George W. Bush's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, White House counsel Harriet Miers, abruptly withdrew from consideration on Thursday after mounting criticism from the right and the left about her

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