Dick Cheney

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

"As teenagers' scores on standardized reading tests have declined or stagnated, some argue that the hours spent prowling the Internet are the enemy of reading-diminishing literacy, wrecking attention spans and destroying a precious common culture that exists only through the reading of books," writes Motoko Rich in The New York Times. "But others say the Internet has created a new kind of reading, one that schools and society should not discount."

I believe this so-called "new kind of reading" is the result of the old kind of writing, which has become really bad.

I'm talking about the writing in mainstream media-newspapers, magazines and books-whose managements are so financially strapped that they can't afford decent editors. The result: Authors left to themselves are sloppy, self-indulgent and frequently boring as dirt.

This is also true of writing on the Internet and BlackBerrys/other mobile devices.

One of the sublime pleasures of researching and writing this cranky little e-zine is watching a story build and then spin totally out of control—just like the cyclone in “The Wizard of Oz.” Just when you think things couldn’t possibly get worse for the people involved, they do. Julie Roehm, the 35-year-old dynamic senior VP-marketing communications at Wal-Mart was brought in from the automobile industry to oversee the company’s half-billion-dollar-plus advertising budget. She allegedly rubbed Sean Womack, Wal-Mart’s VP of marketing communications, the right way and everybody else the wrong way—and the two lovebirds were thrown out on their tails. Not only is Roehm

What Republicans can learn from Warren Buffett Nov. 1, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 44 IN THE NEWS US Death Toll in Iraq Reaches 2,000 BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN)--The U.S. military death toll in Iraq reached 2,000 Tuesday with the reports of three new deaths, and President Bush prepared the nation for more casualties, saying the "defense of freedom is worth our sacrifice. --CNN.com, Oct. 26, 2005 Miers Withdraws Nomination President George W. Bush's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, White House counsel Harriet Miers, abruptly withdrew from consideration on Thursday after mounting criticism from the right and the left about her

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