Dan Poynter

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

The good news: A published book can burnish a career and add cred to a résumé. The bad news: Chances are, you'll be dead before you find an agent or publisher. The good news: It's easy to publish a book on your own. First, sign up for Publishing Poynters, Dan Poynter's amazing information-rich monthly newsletter, choc-a-bloc full of publishing news, information and resources. It's free. Next, write the book.

When I saw that the 2008 rate for a speech by Larry Summers was $45,000 to $135,000, I got to thinking.

Out of curiosity, I started prowling the various Web sites of speakers' bureaus and came to six conclusions:

  1. It seems everybody in the world is available for speeches. Included are political and show business stars, second and third bananas, and hundreds upon hundreds of people I never heard of.
  2. All of these people—luminaries and nobodies—get fees from $1,000 to $1 million, plus expenses.
  3. I used to make a lot of speeches, and all I ever got was expenses and a plaque with my name engraved on it.
  4. I was a damned fool. I was as much a nobody as anybody else and could've picked up some dough if I'd just asked.
  5. If someone invites you to make a speech, think about asking for an honorarium at the very least, if not a fat fee, plus expenses. For Colin Powell, expenses include a private jet along with his $100,000 fee.
  6. The worst that can happen is that no money in the budget exists for fees or expenses. If you refuse, someone will replace you.

Note: Denny Hatch personally replies to all correspondence. Readers Respond & Debate “How to Deal with the Media,” published June 22, 2006. “Beware of the taped TV interview. A suck-up reporter will show up with a camera crew and will ask a lot of questions that make you feel very important. The result will be a one-sentence sound bite taken out of context designed to buttress the producer’s biased agenda or be the one dissenting opinion amidst a blizzard of verbiage from the other side. Either way, you’ll look like a jerk. When asked to do a TV interview, I always reply, ‘I don’t do sound

Welcome to the Toughest Business on Earth April 11, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 28 IN THE NEWS AMAZING TUGS by the Crowley Corporation Every once in a while a book comes along that captures the imagination of kids and adults who are young at heart. The Crowley Corporate Communications group has published a children's book about tugboats entitled AMAZING TUGS. —MarEx Newsletter, April 7, 2006 According to publishing guru Dan Poynter, a survey by the Gallup Organization found that 82 percent of the population believe they have a book inside them. Six million people have already written a manuscript. That

Their work can be all about them Nov. 8, 2005: Vol. 1, Issue No. 46 IN THE NEWS The Book on a Graphics Superhero Mr. Kidd's home is more like a very expensive toy store. It reflects the same graphic punch seen in his book covers, which helped transform the American book jacket from a decorative bit of packaging into a striking evocation of the writing it contained. Its items are arranged like a pocket shrine, as much a carefully curated archive of Mr. Kidd's obsessions and evolving eye as his new book, "Chip Kidd, Book One: Work: 1986-2006," published this month by Rizzoli.

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