Claire McCaskill

Mark Michelson is the Editor-in-Chief of Printing ImpressionsServing in this role since 1985, Michelson is an award-winning journalist and member of several industry honor societies. Reader feedback is always encouraged. Email mmichelson@napco.com

"The Postal Reform Act of 2018: Improving Postal Operations, Service, and Transparency" was introduced in the U.S. Senate last week as a bipartisan bill co-sponsored by senators Tom Carper (D-Del.), Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.). If passed, the legislation would make sweeping changes to current rules and regulations that have led, in large part, to the dire long-term financial situation of the U.S. Postal Service.

Iowa and North Carolina said they are looking into a breach involving a subsidiary of Experian that exposed some 200 million social security numbers, in addition to two states that previously announced investigations. Separately U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill, a Democrat from Missouri, chided the company, saying she was concerned it had changed its explanation of how it was responding to the breach. McCaskill told Reuters she was troubled to learn Experian has recently said it would not be able to notify people whose social security numbers were compromised in the scheme. "It's troubling that Experian would wait three months after

For the second time in as many weeks, the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs cancelled their plans to advance the fundamentally flawed postal bill, S. 1486. In the face of serious concerns about the bill raised by several Democrats on the committee, as well as by postal unions and postal customers, Committee Chair Tom Carper (D-DE) and Ranking Member Tom Coburn (R-OK) first cancelled a mark-up of the bill scheduled November 6th. Now, the committee leaders have again scrapped their latest attempt to mark-up the bill, which had been scheduled for Nov. 20th

A range of Senate Democrats—many from red states—have serious concerns about a leading proposal to overhaul the U.S. Postal Service, adding a new impediment to Congress’s efforts to get legislation done. The Postal Service is on pace to bleed more than $20 billion over 2012 and 2013, and top officials there have urged Democrats and Republicans to come together on a legislative fix. But in the latest setback for postal reform, some Democrats say a current Senate bill would do too much to, among other things, slow down delivery standards and eat into USPS’s remaining competitive advantages

What does this actually mean for AdLand? The tax deduction for advertising costs could be revisited. While Mr. Obama didn't bring it up during his first term, it's just the sort of tax loophole that was mentioned by both candidates during the debates. Dan Jaffe, executive vice president of government relations for the Association of National Advertisers, told Ad Age earlier this year that it would be unwise "for advertising companies to think we are immune. We will not take anything for granted." Online privacy is another area of concern.

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