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Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

If you’ve spent any time at all on Twitter and Facebook during the last week or so, you’ve undoubtably heard about KONY2012. The campaign by the nonprofit advocacy group Invisible Children centered around Joseph Kony, the Ugandan warlord and leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, a guerrilla group with a long and violent history that includes the kidnapping of children. With striking and dramatic imagery and Hollywood-style editing, the campaign video presents an utterly compelling message in the age of “social” media: by simply clicking “share,” you can make a difference in the world. And “share” the world did …

I was zipping around the Internet and bopping in and out of my e-mail when a Yahoo headline hit me in the face: “Tim Russert dies.” I clicked on the news story and couldn’t believe it. I still don’t. Russert’s passing at age 58 is a national catastrophe. Look out politicians. Beware business folks. In this GOTCHA! world, the goo-goos are gonna getcha. Memories of Tim Russert The last time I spent quality time with Russert was watching him on May 20, the night of the final major primaries in Kentucky and Oregon. He was pumped, bubbling with enthusiasm, his eyes shining.

I guess in terms of the country—and the balance of trade—a crashing dollar is a good thing. For my balance of trade, it stinks. We flew into London last Saturday and went out for dinner. A bowl of soup for lunch was £8.50, which translates to $17.00. A £4.00 ride on the Underground for 10 blocks to get out of a rainstorm was $8.00 ($16 for two)—not a lot of fun. Dinner for two was at least $100 pretty much anywhere. An exception was the Albert Pub. The bad news: the food was so-so. The good news: dinner was relatively inexpensive. The best

On two successive evenings last week—at the New York auction houses, Christie’s and Sotheby’s—a half-billion dollars worth of art changed hands. I am fascinated by the art world—the work itself, the lives of the artists, collectors great and small, and the value and prices that art commands. Plus, of course, the business of auctions and museums is intriguing. Relatively few people have money to buy great works of art for their homes and yachts. Fortunately for the rest of us, many of the great collectors either founded public museums of their own or left their art to established institutions. Since no advertisements were booked

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