Carly Fiorina

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Kevin Kelleher leads marketing for Return Path Consumer Insight line of business. He helps people see how data can be used to make smarter decisions. In his spare time, Kevin enjoys running, reading and fencing.

A lot has changed since 2012 (let alone 2008), and those running for president have many options for reaching various constituencies. One thing that hasn't changed is the importance of email, which remains the primary means of communication for those seeking the White House.

I’m a see guy not a hear guy.

I write better than I talk.

Expressing myself on the phone is difficult while e-correspondence is a breeze. I’m good at it; I get to the point; I don’t waste people’s time.

Nothing drives me crazier than the voice-mail jail that certain organizations have instituted. They start with the following recorded message:

“Your call is important to us …”

Whereupon I am given a world-class runaround of confusing choices—all recorded—that takes me further and further into the corporate labyrinth. One wrong choice and I am sent back to “GO.” Finally I get:

“All our representatives are currently busy … However, your call is important to us …”

What that message is really saying: “We’re having happy hour here in India and you are a big fat pain in the ass.”

Last June 30, on my daily travels through the Internet, a story smacked me in the nose: “Commanding Role for Women in the Military,” was the headline of Rachel L. Swarns’ New York Times article. The lede:

WASHINGTON - For more than a decade, Lt. General Ann E. Dunwoody has delighted in leaping through the doors of military planes and plunging into the night with a parachute on her back.

A master parachutist and a former battalion commander, Gen. Dunwoody handled logistics for the 82nd Airborne Division in Saudi Arabia during the first gulf war. As a three-star general, she has flown to Afghanistan and Iraq to ensure the steady flow of ammunition, tanks and fuel to the troops.

But one of the biggest joys of her 33-year military career has been jumping out of airplanes and into roles previously unimaginable to generations of women in the Army. Last week, President Bush asked General Dunwoody to take over a new Army command as a four-star general. If confirmed by the Senate, she will become the first woman in the armed services to achieve that rank.

“A woman four-star general,” I thought. “WOW!”

I was a two-year draftee in 1958-1960. I thought the Army was great.

I think it’s even better now that it has its first woman four-star general.

From 1920 to 1933, Henry L. Stimson was secretary of state in the Hoover administration. In 1929, he closed down the State’s cryptanalytic office and his quote about gentlemen not reading each other’s mail became famous. Fortunately he changed his mind when he headed the War Department under Franklin D. Roosevelt. Had the United States not broken the Japanese code in the early years of World War II, tens of thousands of American lives would have been lost. The same is true for the Brits intercepting German radio traffic with the now-famous Enigma machines at Bletchley Park. Down deep inside, I agree with Stimson; snooping

Who Speaks for Your Company? The new General Motors strategy of offering employee pricing on all new models resulted in a 47-percent sales increase in June. Ford promptly followed suit. Chrysler went them both one better by not only offering employee discounts but bringing back Lee Iacocca--the man who saved the company in 1982 and became its spokesman--to do the TV commercials, complete with the line he made famous, "If you can find a better car, buy it." In 1955 Ogilvy & Mather dreamed up the idea of using the CEO of Schweppes USA, the elegant, bearded Commander Edward Whitehead, as the centerpiece of

The Appalling Management Style of Presidents When the Vanity Fair story broke last week that Mark Felt was the legendary "Deep Throat" character that fueled The Washington Post's investigation into the Watergate scandal, I watched Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein interviewed the next day by Matt Lauer on NBC's "Today" show. A remark by Bernstein floored me: "We had no idea of his motivations, and even now come of his motivations are unclear." Could Bernstein be serious? Here was one of two guys who knew more about Watergate than anyone in the world and he showed himself to have the sensitivity of a

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