Bryant

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

I’ve written a number of times that one way to deal harshly with unfriendly media is to deny access: Issue no press credentials. Force them to stand with their noses to the window pane and regurgitate the same AP or Reuters stories that all the other cheapskate newspapers and magazines use. That the Obama campaign has denied access to The New Yorker is delicious. I have 104 days to make up my mind, and I’m still not sure about Barack Obama or John McCain. Will this be yet another presidential election where I go into a voting booth holding my nose and pulling the

Here are two stories about people working for two businesses—an employee in one and members of the board in the other—who knew a lot about their respective companies. Both allegedly annexed a core product and went into competition with it. Both cases have resulted in lawsuits and countersuits. A person that would do this to an employer is a fungus—a parasitic organism that obtains nourishment by locking onto a host and sucking it dry. What can you do if such a person is loose in your company? If you have an idea for a new product, do you develop it and then offer it

Is Touchy-Feely Customer Research the Way to Go? March 23, 2006: Vol. 2, Issue No. 23 IN THE NEWS Best Buy thinks outside the big box In several concept stores located in the Midwest, Best Buy is gathering data about consumer behavior in retail outlets that are quite different from the "big box" stores normally associated with America's largest consumer electronics retailer. The new stores, with names like Eq-life, Studio d and Escape, are helping Best Buy understand how to improve the shopping experience of a new class of technology buyers. —Tom Krazit, C/Netnews.com, March 21, 2006 Brad Anderson is CEO of Best

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