Bruce Biegel

Marketing Sustainably: A blog posting questions, opportunities, concerns and observations on sustainability in marketing. Chet Dalzell has 25 years of public relations management and expertise in service to leading brands in consumer, donor, patient and business-to-business markets, and in the field of integrated marketing. He serves on the DMA International ECHO Awards Board of Governors, as an adviser to the Direct Marketing Club of New York and Marketing Idea eXchange, and is senior director, communications and industry relations, with the Digital Advertising Alliance. Chet loves UConn Basketball (men's and women's) and Nebraska Football (that's just men, at this point), too! 

Customer identity and data privacy are at the core of every marketing strategy, driving everything brands are doing — from social media marketing to in-store email collection. The 360-degree customer experience demands it; especially now that data privacy legislation reminiscent of GDPR looms in the U.S. in 2020.

The January marketing calendar in New York has included for the past decade or so a certain can’t-miss event of the Direct Marketing Club of New York. In 60 fly-by minutes, 100-plus advertising and marketing professionals hear a review of the previous year in marketing spend, a media outlook for the current year and macro-economic trends driving both.

American ad and marketing spending will far outpace GDP in 2018, at $316 billion — up 4.8 percent over 2017, and beyond the expected 2.8 percent growth in GDP slated for 2018, reads recent research.

Last week, Bruce Biegel, senior managing director of Winterberry Group, led a Direct Marketing Club of New York discussion on “customer data onboarding.” It's the process of linking offline data with online attributes (cookies, IP address, device IDs, non-cookie identifiers, among other identifiers) in order to perform any number of marketing use cases, what often is referred to as “data activation.”

Marketing today is a team sport. All the game-changing technology and techniques look great on paper, but they’re just scribbles without the people to make it happen. Building the team to use them to peak effectiveness means finding a more diverse and highly skilled roster than ever before.

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