Brian Halligan

Thorin McGee is editor-in-chief and content director of Target Marketing and oversees editorial direction and product development for the magazine, website and other channels.

We often think of disruption coming from a new product, the way computers seemed to. "Here's this thing we never had before, and it changes everything." But in reality, disruption comes from changes in service. It's the new, easier ways to do things that create customer delight ... and disruption.

We used to talk to a real person as a first step. To get familiar with the company. To learn more. To create bonds. Not now. Now we talk to a real person as a last resort, after we’ve kicked the informational tires so thoroughly that we absolutely must reach out to get our final questions answered, prepurchase. This is most egregiously true in a category where the transactional stakes are often the highest: business to business marketing. ... B-to-B customers will contact a sales rep only after independently completing 60 percent of the purchasing decision process

I am a seasoned chief marketing officer. I went to an Ivy League college, have an MBA from Wharton, served for many years as CMO of a billion-dollar publisher, and most recently, served as CMO of a major technology consultancy. Yet just a few years ago, I was well on my way to becoming obsolete. You see, nearly everything I learned, did and experienced as a marketer was wrong. I was analog in a digital world. I tended to be more creative than analytical. Content marketing was barely on my radar screen, let alone content marketing best practices

You already know how to divide your audience into broad groups. Now it's time to create unique individual targeting. What do Pandora, Netflix, and Amazon all have in common? All three are world-class "segmenters." Almost everyone segments to some extent—targeting different customers with different marketing—but typically those segments are big, macro-level segments. Software companies may have an "enterprise" segment and a small business segment. But Pandora, Netflix, and Amazon take it to another level by creating "segments of one": micro-segments that target each customer uniquely, allowing the companies to convert visitors into long-term, high-value customers at very high rates.

Three months after receiving a $32 million Series D financing round, led by Sequoia Capital, Google Ventures, and Salesforce.com, inbound marketing software company HubSpot announced its acquisition of marketing automation company Performable for an undisclosed sum.

HubSpot, Inc. announces the creation of Book Grader, a free diagnostic tool for authors to track and improve the marketing of their books online. The tool was developed by HubSpot co-founder and CTO Dharmesh Shah to track the success of the Inbound Marketing book. The book, co-authored by Shah and HubSpot CEO and founder Brian Halligan, was released on October 19, 2009 by Wiley and serves as a how-to guide to inbound marketing for businesses.

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