Bob Dylan

Denny Hatch is the author of six books on marketing and four novels, and is a direct marketing writer, designer and consultant. His latest book is “Write Everything Right!” Visit him at dennyhatch.com.

Chuck McLeester's blog explores issues about marketing and marketing measurement. He is a marketing strategist and analyst with experience in healthcare, pharmaceuticals, financial services, pet products, travel/hospitality, publishing and other categories. He spent several years as a client-side direct marketer and 25 years on the agency side developing expertise in direct, digital, and relationship marketing. Now he consults with marketers and advertising agencies to create measurable marketing programs.

If you weren’t a marketing professional, you’d probably find it hard to believe that there is a debate of sorts in rather large organizations about personalization in marketing. In many cases, it’s less of a debate than an absence of one — or serious consideration, or a plan to get there.

Music is a powerful marketing vehicle that fits neatly into the social media space. Big brands have aligned with celebrity artists to reach Millennials in their native social media milieu. Taylor Swift is the face of Keds and Diet Coke. Impresario JayZ has a multi-million dollar deal with Samsung, and Katie Perry is on board with H&M to name just a few. Music festivals have become mega-marketing events with a complex web of social sharing opportunities.

It looks like the economy is improving and more firms are hiring new or additional marketing staff. Unfortunately, time and time again, principals make illogical and critical mistakes when hiring marketers. Let’s take a close look at three of them. Hiring Extroverts: Over the years, we’ve collectively come to the understanding that there is a type of person that is good at marketing (I’m including business development in here, too). This person is an extrovert. Unfortunately, this couldn’t be further from the truth

The dry test is a beautiful thing. If you have an itch to start a magazine, two ways exist to scratch that itch: 1. Dry test. Spend $100,000 to find a universe of likely subscribers, create a direct mail package that makes your magazine so real that people believe it exists, offer three issues free, and see if anybody responds. You won’t know retention, which only comes after the publication has started and readers either love it or are ho-hummed by it. But a dry test will let you see if your idea fogs the mirror. 2. Spend millions starting a magazine and hope someone buys it. A

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